Genome evolution of a nonparasitic secondary heterotroph, the diatom Nitzschia putrida

Kamikawa, Ryoma, Mochizuki, Takako, Sakamoto, Mika, Tanizawa, Yasuhiro, Nakayama, Takuro, Onuma, Ryo, Cenci, Ugo, Moog, Daniel, Speak, Samuel ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4207-7562, Sarkozi, Krisztina, Toseland, Andrew, van Oosterhout, Cock ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5653-738X, Oyama, Kaori, Kato, Misako, Kume, Keitaro, Kayama, Motoki, Azuma, Tomonori, Ishii, Ken-ichiro, Miyashita, Hideaki, Henrissat, Bernard, Lombard, Vincent, Win, Joe, Kamoun, Sophien ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0290-0315, Kashiyama, Yuichiro, Mayama, Shigeki, Miyagishima, Shin-ya, Tanifuji, Goro, Mock, Thomas ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9604-0362 and Nakamura, Yasukazu (2022) Genome evolution of a nonparasitic secondary heterotroph, the diatom Nitzschia putrida. Science Advances, 8 (17). ISSN 2375-2548

[thumbnail of sciadv.abi5075]
Preview
PDF (sciadv.abi5075) - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Secondary loss of photosynthesis is observed across almost all plastid-bearing branches of the eukaryotic tree of life. However, genome-based insights into the transition from a phototroph into a secondary heterotroph have so far only been revealed for parasitic species. Free-living organisms can yield unique insights into the evolutionary consequence of the loss of photosynthesis, as the parasitic lifestyle requires specific adaptations to host environments. Here, we report on the diploid genome of the free-living diatom Nitzschia putrida (35 Mbp), a nonphotosynthetic osmotroph whose photosynthetic relatives contribute ca. 40% of net oceanic primary production. Comparative analyses with photosynthetic diatoms and heterotrophic algae with parasitic lifestyle revealed that a combination of gene loss, the accumulation of genes involved in organic carbon degradation, a unique secretome, and the rapid divergence of conserved gene families involved in cell wall and extracellular metabolism appear to have facilitated the lifestyle of a free-living secondary heterotroph.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Funding Information: This work was supported by JSPS Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B) (19H03274 to R.K., 20H03305 to T.N., and 17H03723 to G.T.); JSPS Grants-in-Aid for Early-Career Scientists (20K15783 to Y.T.); JSPS Grant-in-Aid for Challenging Research (Exploratory) (21K19303 to G.T.); JSPS Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (A) (18H03743 to Y.K.); JSPS Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas, Platform for Advanced Genome Science (16H06279 to R.K., T.Moch, M.S., Y.T., and Y.N.); NERC (NE/R000883/1 to T. Mock, C.v.O., A.T., K.S., and S.S.); School of Environmental Sciences at the University of East Anglia, UK (to T. Mock, C.v.O., A.T., K.S., and S.S.); The Gatsby Charitable Foundation and Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) (to S.K. and J.W.); and NIG-JOINT (7A2017, 6A2018, and 30A2019 to R.K.).
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Science > School of Environmental Sciences

Faculty of Science > School of Biological Sciences
Related URLs:
Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 07 Nov 2022 11:30
Last Modified: 14 Nov 2022 09:30
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/89679
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abi5075

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item