A review of planting principles to identify the right place for the right tree for ‘net zero plus’ woodlands: Applying a place‐based natural capital framework for sustainable, efficient and equitable (SEE) decisions

Bateman, Ian J., Anderson, Karen, Argles, Arthur, Belcher, Claire, Betts, Richard A., Binner, Amy, Brazier, Richard E., Cho, Frankie H. T., Collins, Rebecca M., Day, Brett H., Duran-Rojas, Carolina, Eisenbarth, Sabrina, Gannon, Kate, Gatis, Naomi, Groom, Ben, Hails, Rosie, Harper, Anna B., Harwood, Amii, Hastings, Astley, Heard, Matthew S., Hill, Timothy C., Inman, Alex, Lee, Christopher F., Luscombe, David J., MacKenzie, Angus R., Mancini, Mattia C., Morison, James I. L., Morris, Aaron, Quine, Chris P., Snowdon, Pat, Tyler, Charles R., Vanguelova, Elena I., Wilkinson, Matthew, Williamson, Daniel and Xenakis, Georgios (2023) A review of planting principles to identify the right place for the right tree for ‘net zero plus’ woodlands: Applying a place‐based natural capital framework for sustainable, efficient and equitable (SEE) decisions. People and Nature, 5 (2). pp. 271-301. ISSN 2575-8314

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Abstract

We outline the principles of the natural capital approach to decision making and apply these to the contemporary challenge of very significantly expanding woodlands as contribution to attaining net zero emissions of greenhouse gases. Drawing on the case of the UK, we argue that a single focus upon carbon storage alone is likely to overlook the other ‘net zero plus’ benefits which woodlands can deliver. A review of the literature considers the wide variety of potential benefits which woodlands can provide, together with costs such as foregone alternative land uses. We argue that decision making must consider all of these potential benefits and costs for the right locations to be planted with the right trees. The paper closes by reviewing the decision support systems necessary to incorporate this information into policy and decision making.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Special Issue: Special Feature ‐ The Multiple Values of Nature. Research Funding: Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council. Grant Number: BB/V011588/1, Turing-HSBC-ONS Economic Data Science Award. DATA AVAILABILITY STATEMENT: This is a review paper and has no original data to archive.
Uncontrolled Keywords: ecology, evolution, behavior and systematics,sdg 15 - life on land ,/dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/1100/1105
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Science > School of Environmental Sciences
UEA Research Groups: Faculty of Science > Research Centres > Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment (CSERGE)
Faculty of Science > Research Groups > Environmental Social Sciences
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Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 07 Jun 2022 11:30
Last Modified: 05 Apr 2023 08:30
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/85391
DOI: 10.1002/pan3.10331

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