The impact of competitive scenarios on individual and team behaviour

Nasamu, Emike (2020) The impact of competitive scenarios on individual and team behaviour. Doctoral thesis, University of East Anglia.

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Abstract

In this thesis, we study the impact of competitive scenarios on individual and team behaviour. In chapter one, we study experimentally the role of leadership in teams facing a game with a complex strategy space. Teams of three members face an instance of a team dispatching problem, in which the members jointly devise then separately implement a plan to visit a set of locations on a map. Some teams have one member designated as a “leader”, although this role does not confer any distinct responsibility or capability in the game. We compare the performance of teams with elected leaders, appointed leaders, and no leaders. We find that teams with leaders perform better than those without, while teams with elected leaders and teams with appointed leaders perform similarly. Our results indicate that electing a leader serves as a device to coordinate team activity, and is valuable primarily when a team needs to be able to deliver well immediately. We find that teams with leaders are more confident than those without, but this additional confidence is in line with those teams’ superior performance.

In chapter two, we study experimentally the effects of individual skill in a real-performance task and the responsiveness of individual skill to various incentive schemes. Participants faced instances of the Truck Dispatch Problem, in which they devised three journeys which visit a set of locations on a map. Some participants were remunerated under a rank order tournament incentive scheme, some participants were informed of their performance ranking and were given a fixed rate whilst some participants were remunerated under a fixed rate incentive scheme. We find evidence for individual skill differences in the task, but that the distribution of these differences does not depend on the incentive treatment.

In chapter three, we study empirically the effects of domestic and international football tournaments on domestic abuse in England and Wales and how these effects vary with people’s expectations of the football match outcomes. Previous studies on domestic abuse and football in England and Wales have focused primarily on international tournaments and have not taken into account the effects of expected match outcomes. This is surprising given the visibility of the English Premier League (EPL). We find in our analysis, that the existence of an EPL fixture is associated with a 1% percent increase in domestic violence while the existence of a FIFA World Cup fixture is associated with a 3% increase in domestic violence in England and Wales. Our results, also suggest that expected match outcomes have strong effects on domestic violence in
England and Wales.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Social Sciences > School of Economics
Depositing User: Chris White
Date Deposited: 02 Dec 2020 15:16
Last Modified: 02 Dec 2020 15:16
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/77869
DOI:

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