Historical trajectories of disaster risk in Dominica

Barclay, Jennifer ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6122-197X, Wilkinson, Emily, White, Carole ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7741-0444, Shelton, Clare, Forster, Johanna ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6729-9965, Few, Roger, Lorenzoni, Irene, Woolhouse, George, Jowitt, Claire ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5232-7003, Stone, Harriette and Honychurch, Lennox (2019) Historical trajectories of disaster risk in Dominica. International Journal of Disaster Risk Science, 10 (2). pp. 149-165. ISSN 2095-0055

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Abstract

The calamitous consequences of 2017 Hurricane Maria for the Caribbean island of Dominica highlighted the acute and increasing susceptibility of the region to disasters. Despite increasing international attention to disaster risk reduction, recovery from hazard events can be especially lengthy and difficult for small island developing states. In this article, we build on existing understandings of disaster risk as a physical and social condition, showing that historical processes are fundamental to understanding how conditions of risk emerge and persist over time. We take an integrated approach to analyzing the drivers of risk accumulation, using the example of Dominica, where processes set in motion during the colonial period have shaped the location of people and assets, the degree to which they might be harmed, the societal repercussions of that harm and the prospects for recovery. We focus on the underlying economic vulnerabilities and physical exposure to hazards created by agricultural, economic, and social practices, and successive disaster responses that have constrained recovery. Uncovering these historical drivers and persistent issues, elucidates lessons for pursuing a more resilient development trajectory, including through the promotion of economic restructuring and diversification, and land reform.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: sdg 2 - zero hunger ,/dk/atira/pure/sustainabledevelopmentgoals/zero_hunger
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Science > School of Environmental Sciences
Faculty of Social Sciences > School of Global Development (formerly School of International Development)
Faculty of Arts and Humanities > School of History

Faculty of Arts and Humanities > School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing
University of East Anglia Research Groups/Centres > Theme - ClimateUEA
UEA Research Groups: Faculty of Science > Research Groups > Geosciences
University of East Anglia Schools > Faculty of Science > Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research
Faculty of Science > Research Centres > Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research
Faculty of Science > Research Groups > Science, Society and Sustainability
Faculty of Social Sciences > Research Groups > Global Environmental Justice
Faculty of Social Sciences > Research Groups > Climate Change
Faculty of Social Sciences > Research Groups > Health and Disease
Faculty of Social Sciences > Research Centres > Water Security Research Centre
Faculty of Arts and Humanities > Research Groups > Medieval History
Faculty of Arts and Humanities > Research Groups > Medieval and Early Modern Research Group
Faculty of Science > Research Groups > Environmental Social Sciences
Faculty of Science > Research Groups > Collaborative Centre for Sustainable Use of the Seas
Faculty of Science > Research Groups > Marine Knowledge Exchange Network
Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 15 Apr 2019 09:30
Last Modified: 20 Oct 2023 01:12
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/70566
DOI: 10.1007/s13753-019-0215-z

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