Frank Zappa and musical theatre: ugly ugly o'phan Annie and really deep, intense, thought-provoking Broadway symbolism

Hand, Richard and Carr, Paul (2007) Frank Zappa and musical theatre: ugly ugly o'phan Annie and really deep, intense, thought-provoking Broadway symbolism. Studies in Musical Theatre, 1 (1). pp. 41-56. ISSN 1750-3159

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Abstract

The performances of Frank Zappa were renowned for their theatricality and Zappa himself claimed that Nobody has combined music and theatrics in the way I have. Aside from Zappa's legendary and theatrical stage performances, some of his specific compositions have a consciously dramatic narrative that can be fruitfully analysed as remarkable and thoroughly provocative examples of musical theatre. In particular, two works stand out: Joe's Garage Acts I, II and III (1979) a bleak yet humorous satire set in a science fiction dystopia, and Thing-Fish (1984), a narrative-driven drama that explicitly explores yet subverts the Broadway musical form in its uncompromising investigation of AIDS and its social and political impact. In addition, both works demonstrate a disruptive and eviscerating satirical use of sexuality and sex.

Item Type: Article
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Arts and Humanities > School of Art, Media and American Studies
University of East Anglia > Faculty of Arts and Humanities > Research Groups > Film, Television and Media
Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 28 Feb 2017 01:46
Last Modified: 22 May 2020 23:53
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/62744
DOI:

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