Storefront Revolutionary:Martin Sostre's Afro-Asian Bookshop, Black Liberation Culture, and the New Left, 1964-1975

Mclaughlin, Malcolm (2014) Storefront Revolutionary:Martin Sostre's Afro-Asian Bookshop, Black Liberation Culture, and the New Left, 1964-1975. The Sixties, 7 (1). pp. 1-27. ISSN 1754-1328

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Abstract

It was as a “political prisoner”–the owner of a radical bookshop and forum for revolutionary debate in Buffalo, New York, who was framed by the police and thrown into jail—that Martin Sostre attained national recognition in the 1960s. At the time, his name appeared alongside the likes of Huey P. Newton but, in the years since, his reputation has somewhat declined. Yet, he has much to tell historians about this turbulent age: as a jailhouse lawyer for the Nation of Islam in his youth, during his first term in prison, as a Black Power activist in Buffalo, or, later, as a campaigner for prisoners’ rights, and as a community activist in the 1980s-90s, his career traversed a crucial period in American history. This article reconstructs Sostre’s career, illuminating the making of radical culture in the 1960s, the connections between older and newer phases of struggle and between prison and ghetto.

Item Type: Article
Faculty \ School: University of East Anglia > Faculty of Arts and Humanities > Research Groups > American Studies
Faculty of Arts and Humanities > School of Art, Media and American Studies
Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 03 Jun 2014 11:42
Last Modified: 17 Mar 2020 19:29
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/48540
DOI: 10.1080/17541328.2014.930265

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