Reliability of orthostatic beat-to-beat blood pressure tests: implications for population and clinical studies

Finucane, Ciarán, Savva, George M. and Kenny, Roseanne A. (2017) Reliability of orthostatic beat-to-beat blood pressure tests: implications for population and clinical studies. Clinical Autonomic Research, 27 (1). pp. 31-39. ISSN 0959-9851

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    Abstract

    Objective: To assess the test–retest reliability of orthostatic beat-to-beat blood pressure responses to active standing and related clinical definitions of orthostatic hypotension. Methods: A random sample of community-dwelling older adults from the pan-European Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe, Ireland underwent a health assessment that mimicked that of the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing. An active stand test was performed using continuous blood pressure measurements. Participants attended a repeat assessment 4–12 weeks after the initial measurement. A mixed-effects regression model estimated the reliability and minimum detectable change while controlling for fixed observer and time of day effects. Results: A total of 125 individuals underwent repeat assessment (mean age 66.2 ± 7.5 years; 55.6% female). Mean time between visits was 84.3 ± 23.3 days. There was no significant mean difference in heart rate or blood pressure recovery variables between the first and repeat assessments. Minimum detectable change was noted for changes from resting values in systolic blood pressure (26.4 mmHg) and diastolic blood pressure (13.7 mmHg) at 110 s and for changes in heart rate (10.9 bpm) from resting values at 30 s after standing. Intra-class correlation values ranged from 0.47 for nadir values to 0.80 for heart rate and systolic blood pressure values measured 110 s after standing. Conclusion: Continuous orthostatic beat-to-beat blood pressure and related clinical definitions show low to moderate reliability and substantial natural variation over a 4–12-week period. Understanding variation in measures is essential for study design or estimating the effects of orthostatic hypotension, while clinically it can be used when evaluating longer term treatment effects.

    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: reliability,orthostatic blood pressure,impaired blood pressure stabilisation,orthostatic hypotension,syncope
    Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Health Sciences
    University of East Anglia > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Research Groups > Health in Later Life
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    Depositing User: Pure Connector
    Date Deposited: 27 Jan 2017 02:11
    Last Modified: 25 Jul 2018 13:10
    URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/62203
    DOI: 10.1007/s10286-016-0393-3

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