A practical examination of academic videographic criticism through creative practice research: the art of videographic thinking.

Scott, Daryl (2024) A practical examination of academic videographic criticism through creative practice research: the art of videographic thinking. Doctoral thesis, University of East Anglia.

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Abstract

There is a growing body of literature related to academic videographic criticism. Yet this medium of criticism has not previously been analysed through the form of a screen production enquiry. For this reason, this creative-critical PhD investigates academic videographic criticism through a practice-led methodology, framing the study of academic videographic criticism as screen production research. The research unfolds by exploring three key elements: firstly, introducing creative practice research as a methodology; secondly, evaluating the video essay format as a critical mode of production and research method; and finally, applying these insights to interpret the work of Terrence Malick using practice. Through the lens of a first-person perspective and the creation of the critical video essay, Negotiating-Z,1 this doctoral enquiry makes a productive and original contribution to academic videographic criticism. This is by examining the embodied role of researcher-practitioner in the creative research process. Therefore, using a first-person perspective, this thesis employs a form of self-reflection to expand on the tacit knowledge used when working as the Researcher-Practitioner-Spectator to create the artefact. In doing so, this study extends current debates and broadens the methodological approaches available to academic videographic research within a higher education context. Additionally, by creating a critical video essay, the research recontextualises academic cinema as an alternative to traditional scholarly videographic criticism. Doing so experiments with a form of creative convergence, utilising the refractive practices of the essay film form and blending this format with the aesthetic structure of documentary filmmaking.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Arts and Humanities > School of Art, Media and American Studies
Depositing User: Nicola Veasy
Date Deposited: 27 Mar 2024 11:18
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2024 11:18
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/94785
DOI:

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