The evolution of the blockbuster film business model during the New Hollywood period: a qualitative investigation of five case studies, 1966-1985.

Ross, Alexander (2020) The evolution of the blockbuster film business model during the New Hollywood period: a qualitative investigation of five case studies, 1966-1985. Doctoral thesis, University of East Anglia.

[thumbnail of ROSS MASTER THESIS 15 May 2020. Final.pdf]
Preview
PDF
Download (2MB) | Preview

Abstract

This thesis examines the New Hollywood period from 1966 to 1985. Five representative blockbuster films are examined in detail: The Godfather, Jaws, Star Wars, Grease and Back to the Future. These are studied as a means to investigate the evolution of the blockbuster business model throughout this period from the perspective of entrepreneurial decision making, and the extent they innovated various factors, marking the success of blockbuster films, that became replicable. The thesis offers a qualitative study from the historical perspective situating the New Hollywood Era between the Studio Era and the subsequent rise of the Franchise Blockbuster Era.

The case studies share many defining markers that are central to the development of blockbuster films. The markers are examined in a cluster analysis to assess the validating range of their role in the blockbuster business model. This thesis contends that there are proxy markers of blockbuster films that add research value to understanding the entrepreneurial evolution of the blockbuster business model and its appeal to studio executive management. These markers are: scale of production budget, saturation booking of theatres, scope of advertising campaign, visual effects, audience research, source of adaptation or original creative material, extent of roles and control in business and artistic domains, use of star talent, film reviews, impact on stock price value and annual financial reports, as well as markers of narrative development. The extent to which these markers are present best defines the blockbuster film.

The markers constitute a valuable guide for minimizing and controlling the risks of investments in development, production and marketing. They also signal how studios might position a film for a successful release where revenue streams extend beyond the initial box office release phase. Contrary to a widely popular belief that the industry does not know enough to effectively predict and secure box office success, this thesis outlines a clear, cogent model of intersecting markers that reinforce a viable blockbuster business model attuned to long-term capital profitability.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Arts and Humanities > School of Art, Media and American Studies
Depositing User: Chris White
Date Deposited: 06 Mar 2024 12:11
Last Modified: 06 Mar 2024 12:11
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/94587
DOI:

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item