Understanding Narratives of Relatedness: Exploring the Journeys of two Young People with SEND Engaging in a Music-mentoring Programme

Jackson, Jake (2023) Understanding Narratives of Relatedness: Exploring the Journeys of two Young People with SEND Engaging in a Music-mentoring Programme. Doctoral thesis, University of East Anglia.

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Abstract

The aim of this research project was to gather an in-depth understanding of the experiences of two young people (YP) with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), and their parents, music mentors and key professionals, in relation to a music-mentoring programme (Noise Solution; NS). The literature suggests music-making programmes may hold transformational potential to support reflective processes around self-identity and enhance the wellbeing of YP in challenging circumstances (Gregori-Signes & Corachan, 2014). Using Self Determination Theory (SDT) as a guiding framework, the research sought to explore the narratives of participants to gain a more holistic understanding of how the programme provided opportunities to enhance relatedness and, in turn wellbeing. The research utilised a merged multiple case study and narrative approach, exploring the collective ‘journeys’ of two YP with SEND. Each ‘case’ was comprised of the YP, their parent, music mentor and key professional. This included an analysis of secondary data of the bespoke digital blogs of the YP and a Microsoft Teams call with the YP (phase one) and semi-structured interviews with their parents, music mentors and key professionals (phase two). Narrative analysis was used to construct an overarching ‘story’ of the journey of the YP in relation to relatedness and wellbeing. The findings provide insight into the unique ways in which the stories of YP (and significant adults around them) can elucidate how such programmes may enhance relatedness and, in turn wellbeing. This research provides a holistic account of the social and relational context behind such programmes, highlighting the potentially transformational power of narrative approaches in the music-making process. Implications and recommendations for future research are discussed, highlighting the potential role of local authorities, educational settings and Educational Psychologists (EP’s) to promote/utilise such approaches to engage YP in challenging circumstances and empower them to construct powerful alternative stories

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Social Sciences > School of Education and Lifelong Learning
Depositing User: Chris White
Date Deposited: 14 Dec 2023 08:25
Last Modified: 14 Dec 2023 08:25
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/93975
DOI:

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