Whole cell studies of substrate and inhibitor specificity of isoprene monooxygenase and related enzymes

Sims, Leanne, Wright, Chloe, Crombie, Andrew, Dawson, Robin, Lockwood, Colin, Le Brun, Nick ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9780-4061, Lehtovirta-Morley, Laura and Murrell, Colin (2023) Whole cell studies of substrate and inhibitor specificity of isoprene monooxygenase and related enzymes. Environmental Microbiology Reports, 15 (6). pp. 809-819. ISSN 1758-2229

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Abstract

Co-oxidation of a range of alkenes, dienes, and aromatic compounds by whole cells of the isoprene-degrading bacterium Rhodococcus sp. AD45 expressing isoprene monooxygenase was investigated, revealing a relatively broad substrate specificity for this soluble diiron centre monooxygenase. A range of 1-alkynes (C2–C8) were tested as potential inhibitors. Acetylene, a potent inhibitor of the related enzyme soluble methane monooxygenase, had little inhibitory effect, whereas 1-octyne was a potent inhibitor of isoprene monooxygenase, indicating that 1-octyne could potentially be used as a specific inhibitor to differentiate between isoprene consumption by bona fide isoprene degraders and co-oxidation of isoprene by other oxygenase-containing bacteria, such as methanotrophs, in environmental samples. The isoprene oxidation kinetics of a variety of monooxygenase-expressing bacteria were also investigated, revealing that alkene monooxygenase from Xanthobacter and soluble methane monooxygenases from Methylococcus and Methylocella, but not particulate methane monooxygenases from Methylococcus or Methylomicrobium, could co-oxidise isoprene at appreciable rates. Interestingly the ammonia monooxygenase from the nitrifier Nitrosomonas europaea could also co-oxidise isoprene at relatively high rates, suggesting that co-oxidation of isoprene by additional groups of bacteria, under the right conditions, might occur in the environment.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Funding Information: The work on this project was funded through an ERC Advanced Grant to J.C.M. (694578—IsoMet); UKRI Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council funding to N.L.B. (BB/M011216/1); ERC Starting Grant and Royal Society Dorothy Hodgkin Research Fellowship to L. L‐M (UNITY 852993 and DH150187) and a Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellowship to A.T.C. (ECF‐2016‐626).
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Science > School of Biological Sciences
Faculty of Science > School of Environmental Sciences
Faculty of Science > School of Chemistry
University of East Anglia Research Groups/Centres > Theme - ClimateUEA
UEA Research Groups: Faculty of Science > Research Groups > Molecular Microbiology
Faculty of Science > Research Groups > Chemistry of Life Processes
Faculty of Science > Research Centres > Centre for Molecular and Structural Biochemistry
Faculty of Science > Research Centres > Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Conservation
Faculty of Science > Research Groups > Environmental Biology
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Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 09 Dec 2023 01:39
Last Modified: 15 Dec 2023 03:08
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/93925
DOI: 10.1111/1758-2229.13212

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