A systematic review of in-patient psychiatric care for people with intellectual disabilities and/or autism: effectiveness, patient safety and experience

Melvin, Clare L. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5621-3417, Barnoux, Magali, Alexander, Regi, Roy, Ashok, Devapriam, John, Blair, Robert, Tromans, Samuel Joseph, Shepstone, Lee and Langdon, Peter E. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7745-1825 (2022) A systematic review of in-patient psychiatric care for people with intellectual disabilities and/or autism: effectiveness, patient safety and experience. BJPsych Open, 8 (6). ISSN 2056-4724

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Abstract

Background: An increasing number of children, adolescents and adults wit intellectual disabilities and/or autism are being admitted to general psychiatric wards and cared for by general psychiatrists. Aims: The aim of this systematic review was to consider the likely effectiveness of in-patient treatment for this population, and compare and contrast differing models of in-patient care. Method: A systematic search was completed to identify papers where authors had reported data about the effectiveness of in-patient admissions with reference to one of the three domains: treatment effect (e.g. length of stay, clinical outcome, readmission), patient safety (e.g. restrictive practices) and patient experience (e.g. patient or family satisfaction). Where possible, outcomes associated with admission were considered further within the context of differing models of in-patient care (e.g. specialist inpatient services versus general mental health in-patient services). Results: A total of 106 studies were included and there was evidence that improvements in mental health, social functioning, behaviour and forensic risk were associated with in-patient admission. There were two main models of in-patient psychiatric care described within the literature: admission to a specialist intellectual disability or general mental health in-patient service. Patients admitted to specialist intellectual disability in-patient services had greater complexity, but there were additional benefits, including fewer out-of-area discharges and lower seclusion rates. Conclusions: There was evidence that admission to in-patient services was associated with improvements in mental health for this population. There was some evidence indicating better outcomes for those admitted to specialist services.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Funding information: This research received no specific grant from any funding agency, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.
Uncontrolled Keywords: intellectual disability,neurodevelopmental disorders,autism spectrum disorders,psychiatric in-patient treatment,mental health,hospital,psychiatry and mental health,sdg 16 - peace, justice and strong institutions,sdg 10 - reduced inequalities,sdg 3 - good health and well-being ,/dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/2700/2738
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Faculty of Science > School of Computing Sciences
Related URLs:
Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 12 Oct 2022 14:33
Last Modified: 21 Nov 2022 09:30
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/89011
DOI: 10.1192/bjo.2022.571

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