Effects of a mediterranean diet on the gut microbiota and microbial metabolites: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials and observational studies

Kimble, Rachel, Gouinguenet, Phebee, Ashor, Ammar, Stewart, Christopher, Deighton, Kevin, Matu, Jamie, Griffiths, Alex, Malcomson, Fiona C., Joel, Abraham, Houghton, David, Stevenson, Emma, Minihane, Anne-Marie ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9042-4226, Siervo, Mario, Shannon, Oliver M. and Mathers, John C. (2022) Effects of a mediterranean diet on the gut microbiota and microbial metabolites: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials and observational studies. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition. ISSN 1040-8398

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Abstract

Consumption of the Mediterranean dietary pattern (MedDiet) is associated with reduced risk of numerous non-communicable diseases. Modulation of the composition and metabolism of the gut microbiota represents a potential mechanism through which the MedDiet elicits these effects. We conducted a systematic literature search (Prospero registration: CRD42020168977) using PubMed, The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, SPORTDiscuss, Scopus and CINAHL databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies exploring the impact of a MedDiet on gut microbiota composition (i.e., relative abundance of bacteria or diversity metrics) and metabolites (e.g., short chain fatty acids). Seventeen RCTs and 17 observational studies were eligible for inclusion in this review. Risk of bias across the studies was mixed but mainly identified as low and unclear. Overall, RCTs and observational studies provided no clear evidence of a consistent effect of a MedDiet on composition or metabolism of the gut microbiota. These findings may be related to the diverse methods across studies (e.g., MedDiet classification and analytical techniques), cohort characteristics, and variable quality of studies. Further, well-designed studies are warranted to advance understanding of the potential effects of the MedDiet using more detailed examination of microbiota and microbial metabolites with reference to emerging characteristics of a healthy gut microbiome.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Funding information: This research was supported by the Alzheimer’s Research UK Prevention and Risk Reduction Fund (ARUK-PRRF2017-006) and the UK Nutrition Research Partnership (UK NRP), an initiative supported by the Medical Research Council (MRC), Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) (MR/T001852/1).
Uncontrolled Keywords: sdg 3 - good health and well-being ,/dk/atira/pure/sustainabledevelopmentgoals/good_health_and_well_being
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 05 Oct 2022 16:31
Last Modified: 25 Oct 2022 09:31
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/88871
DOI: 10.1080/10408398.2022.2057416

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