Construction of fluorescent analogs to follow the uptake and distribution of cobalamin (vitamin B12) in bacteria, worms, and plants

Lawrence, Andrew D., Nemoto-Smith, Emi, Deery, Evelyne, Baker, Joseph A., Schroeder, Susanne, Brown, David G., Tullet, Jennifer M. A., Howard, Mark J., Brown, Ian R., Smith, Alison G., Boshoff, Helena I., Barry, Clifton E. and Warren, Martin J. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6028-6456 (2018) Construction of fluorescent analogs to follow the uptake and distribution of cobalamin (vitamin B12) in bacteria, worms, and plants. Cell Chemical Biology, 25 (8). 941-951.e6. ISSN 2451-9456

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Abstract

Vitamin B12 is made by only certain prokaryotes yet is required by a number of eukaryotes such as mammals, fish, birds, worms, and Protista, including algae. There is still much to learn about how this nutrient is trafficked across the domains of life. Herein, we describe ways to make a number of different corrin analogs with fluorescent groups attached to the main tetrapyrrole-derived ring. A further range of analogs were also constructed by attaching similar fluorescent groups to the ribose ring of cobalamin, thereby generating a range of complete and incomplete corrinoids to follow uptake in bacteria, worms, and plants. By using these fluorescent derivatives we were able to demonstrate that Mycobacterium tuberculosis is able to acquire both cobyric acid and cobalamin analogs, that Caenorhabditis elegans takes up only the complete corrinoid, and that seedlings of higher plants such as Lepidium sativum are also able to transport B12. Lawrence et al., employed chemical biology approaches to construct a range of fluorescent vitamin B12 derivatives. They demonstrated that these fluorescent variants can be used to follow intracellular B12 trafficking in bacteria, including E. coli and M. tuberculosis, the worm C. elegans, and a higher plant (Lepidium sativum).

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Funding Information: This work was supported, in part, by the Intramural Research Program of NIAID and in part by grants from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC; BB/L010208/1, BB/K009249/1, and BB/I012079, and the Wellcone Trust 097627/Z/11/Z). We thank Prof Jason Micklefield (Manchester) and Prof Udo Oppermann (Oxford) for the gift of SAHH and hMATIIA. Our research into B12 uptake into plants was done as part of an outreach program to engage pupils in real scientific research, inspired by the Authentic Biology project (www.authentic-biology.org). The detection and measurement of B12 in the cotyledons of garden cress was performed with the help of the biology teachers and year 11 and 12 pupils at Sir Roger Manwood School in Sandwich, Kent. Teachers: Dr Jackie Wilson and Vicki Beale. Pupils: Megan Battenfield, Megan Betts, Alex Gallagher, Inga Loo, Shiree Kinder, George Morris, Emma Rudge, James Russell, Rebekah Smith, Maddy Stock, Pema Tamang, Elizabeth Westbrook, Himmy Wu, and Katie Fidock. Funding Information: This work was supported, in part, by the Intramural Research Program of NIAID and in part by grants from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC; BB/L010208/1 , BB/K009249/1 , and BB/I012079 , and the Wellcone Trust 097627/Z/11/Z ). We thank Prof Jason Micklefield (Manchester) and Prof Udo Oppermann (Oxford) for the gift of SAHH and hMATIIA. Our research into B 12 uptake into plants was done as part of an outreach program to engage pupils in real scientific research, inspired by the Authentic Biology project ( www.authentic-biology.org ). The detection and measurement of B 12 in the cotyledons of garden cress was performed with the help of the biology teachers and year 11 and 12 pupils at Sir Roger Manwood School in Sandwich, Kent. Teachers: Dr Jackie Wilson and Vicki Beale. Pupils: Megan Battenfield, Megan Betts, Alex Gallagher, Inga Loo, Shiree Kinder, George Morris, Emma Rudge, James Russell, Rebekah Smith, Maddy Stock, Pema Tamang, Elizabeth Westbrook, Himmy Wu, and Katie Fidock. Publisher Copyright: © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
Uncontrolled Keywords: analogs,biosynthesis,caenorhabditis elegans,cobalamin,fluorescence,higher plants,mycobacterium tuberculosis,tetrapyrrole,trafficking,vitamin b12,biochemistry,molecular medicine,molecular biology,pharmacology,drug discovery,clinical biochemistry,sdg 3 - good health and well-being ,/dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/1300/1303
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Science > School of Biological Sciences
Faculty of Science
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Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 20 Sep 2022 14:30
Last Modified: 27 Sep 2022 08:36
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/88482
DOI: 10.1016/j.chembiol.2018.04.012

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