Genome-wide evidence supports mitochondrial relationships and pervasive parallel phenotypic evolution in open-habitat chats

Schweizer, Manuel, Warmuth, Vera M., Alaei Kakhki, Niloofar, Aliabadian, Mansour, Förschler, Marc, Shirihai, Hadoram, Ewels, Phil, Gruselius, Joel, Olsen, Remi André, Schielzeth, Holger, Suh, Alexander ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8979-9992 and Burri, Reto (2019) Genome-wide evidence supports mitochondrial relationships and pervasive parallel phenotypic evolution in open-habitat chats. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 139. ISSN 1055-7903

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Abstract

In wheatears and related species (‘open-habitat chats’), molecular phylogenetics has led to a comprehensively revised understanding of species relationships and species diversity. Phylogenetic analyses have suggested that, in many cases, phenotypic similarities do not reflect species’ relationships, revealing traditionally defined genera as non-monophyletic. This led to the suggestion of pervasive parallel evolution of open-habitat chats’ plumage coloration and ecological phenotypes. However, to date, the molecular evidence for the phylogenetic relationships among open-habitat chats is mainly limited to mitochondrial DNA. Here, we assessed whether the mitochondrial relationships are supported by genome-wide data. To this end, we reconstructed the species tree among 14 open-habitat chat taxa using multi-species coalescent analyses based on ~1’300 SNPs. Our results confirm previous ones based chiefly on mitochondrial DNA; notably the paraphyly of the Oenanthe lugens complex and the clustering of individual species formerly placed in the genera Cercomela and Myrmecocichla within Oenanthe. Since several variable morphological and ecological characteristics occur in multiple places across the open-habitat chat phylogeny, our study consolidates the evidence for pervasive parallel evolution in the plumage coloration and ecology of open-habitat chats.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Funding Information: We thank Martin Irestedt for help with DNA extraction; Max Käller and Mattias Ormestad for generating the genome data; and the EMBL core facilities Heidelberg for their support with sequencing. We thank the late Andreas J. Helbig and Martin Haase (Vogelwarte Hiddensee, Universität Greifswald) for providing samples and Franz Bairlein, Olaf Geiter and Ivan Maggini (Vogelwarte Helgoland, Institute of Avian Research) for support with fieldwork. Computation was performed at the High-Performance Computing Cluster EVE, a joint effort of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research ( UFZ ) and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig. We thank the administration and support staff of EVE: Thomas Schnicke and Ben Langenberg (UFZ), and Christian Krause (iDiv). We acknowledge support from the Science for Life Laboratory , the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, the National Genomics Infrastructure funded by the Swedish Research Council and the Uppsala Multidisciplinary Center for Advanced Computational Science for assistance with high-throughput sequencing and access to the UPPMAX computational infrastructure. N.A.K was supported by the Iranian National Science Foundation ( INSF , 96010126 ), the Ferdowsi University of Mashhad (32567.3) and the Ministry of Science, Research and Technology of the Islamic Republic of Iran. A.S. was supported by the Science of Life Laboratory Swedish Biodiversity Program (2015-R14). Funding Information: We thank Martin Irestedt for help with DNA extraction; Max K?ller and Mattias Ormestad for generating the genome data; and the EMBL core facilities Heidelberg for their support with sequencing. We thank the late Andreas J. Helbig and Martin Haase (Vogelwarte Hiddensee, Universit?t Greifswald) for providing samples and Franz Bairlein, Olaf Geiter and Ivan Maggini (Vogelwarte Helgoland, Institute of Avian Research) for support with fieldwork. Computation was performed at the High-Performance Computing Cluster EVE, a joint effort of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig. We thank the administration and support staff of EVE: Thomas Schnicke and Ben Langenberg (UFZ), and Christian Krause (iDiv). We acknowledge support from the Science for Life Laboratory, the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, the National Genomics Infrastructure funded by the Swedish Research Council and the Uppsala Multidisciplinary Center for Advanced Computational Science for assistance with high-throughput sequencing and access to the UPPMAX computational infrastructure. N.A.K was supported by the Iranian National Science Foundation (INSF, 96010126), the Ferdowsi University of Mashhad (32567.3) and the Ministry of Science, Research and Technology of the Islamic Republic of Iran. A.S. was supported by the Science of Life Laboratory Swedish Biodiversity Program (2015-R14). Publisher Copyright: © 2019 Elsevier Inc.
Uncontrolled Keywords: molecular phylogeny,oenanthe,parallel evolution,saxicolinae,species tree,taxonomy,ecology, evolution, behavior and systematics,molecular biology,genetics ,/dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/1100/1105
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Science > School of Biological Sciences
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Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 16 Sep 2022 13:37
Last Modified: 24 Sep 2022 07:15
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/88394
DOI: 10.1016/j.ympev.2019.106568

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