Use of the espZ gene encoded in the locus of enterocyte effacement for molecular typing of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

Gilmour, Matthew W., Tracz, Dobryan M., Andrysiak, Ashleigh K., Clark, Clifford G., Tyson, Shari, Severini, Alberto and Ng, Lai King (2006) Use of the espZ gene encoded in the locus of enterocyte effacement for molecular typing of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 44 (2). pp. 449-458. ISSN 0095-1137

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

Infections with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) result in frequent cases of sporadic and outbreak-associated enteric bacterial disease in humans. Classification of STEC is by stx genotype (encoding the Shiga toxins), O and H antigen serotype, and seropathotype (subgroupings based upon the clinical relevance and virulence-related genotypes of individual serotypes). The espZ gene is encoded in the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island responsible for the attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions caused by various E. coli pathogens (but not limited to STEC), and this individual gene (∼300 bp) has previously been identified as hypervariable among these A/E pathogens. Sequence analysis of the espZ locus encoded by additional STEC serotypes and strains (including O26:H11, O121:H19, O111:NM, O145:NM, O165:1125, O121:NM, O157:NM, O157:H7, and O5:NM) indicated that distinct sequence variants exist which correlate to subgroups among these serotypes. Allelic discrimination at the espZ locus was achieved using Light Upon extension real-time PCR and by liquid microsphere suspension arrays. The allele subtype of espZ did not correlate with STEC seropathotype classification; however, a correlation with the allele type of the LEE-encoded intimin (eae) gene was supported, and these sequence variations were conserved among individual serotypes. The study focused on the characterization of three clinically significant seropathotypes of LEE-positive STEC, and we have used the observed genetic variation at a pathogen-specific locus for detection and subtyping of STEC.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: microbiology (medical) ,/dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/2700/2726
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Related URLs:
Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 14 Sep 2022 10:31
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2022 02:57
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/88271
DOI: 10.1128/JCM.44.2.449-458.2006

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item