Testing deprivation and threat: A preregistered network analysis of the dimensions of early adversity

Carozza, Sofia, Holmes, Joni ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6821-2793 and Astle, Duncan E. (2022) Testing deprivation and threat: A preregistered network analysis of the dimensions of early adversity. Psychological Science. ISSN 0956-7976

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Abstract

Despite abundant evidence of the detrimental effects of childhood adversity, its nature and underlying mechanisms remain contested. One influential theory, the dimensional model of adversity and psychopathology, proposes deprivation and threat as distinct dimensions of early experience. In this preregistered analysis of data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), we used a network and clustering approach to assess the dimensionality of relationships between childhood adversity and adolescent cognition and emotional functioning, and we used recursive partitioning to identify timing effects. We found evidence that deprivation and threat are separate dimensions of adversity and that early experiences of deprivation cluster with later measures of cognition and emotional functioning. This cluster varies by age of exposure; it includes fewer forms of deprivation as children grow from infancy to middle childhood. Our measures did not form a specific cluster linking threat to emotional functioning

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Funding: The UK Medical Research Council (MRC) and the Wellcome Trust (Grant No. 217065/Z/19/Z), as well as the University of Bristol, provide core support for the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). A comprehensive list of grant funding is available on the ALSPAC website (www.bristol.ac.uk/alspac/external/documents/grant-acknowledgements.pdf). Measures used in this study were funded by an MRC and Wellcome grant to George Davey Smith (Grant No. 076467/Z/05/Z) and a Wellcome grant to Glyn Lewis (Grant No. 08426812/Z/07/Z). This publication is the work of the authors, whose work was funded by a British Marshall Scholarship to S. Carozza, an MRC intramural award (No. G101400) to J. Holmes, an MRC program grant (No. MC-A060-5PQ40) to D. Astle, a James S. McDonnell Foundation Opportunity Award to D. Astle, and a Templeton World Charity Foundation grant (No. 0159) to D. Astle. S. Carozza will serve as guarantor for the contents of this article.
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Social Sciences > School of Psychology
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Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 09 Sep 2022 13:30
Last Modified: 04 Oct 2022 00:22
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/88029
DOI: 10.1177/09567976221101045

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