Spatially explicit risk mapping reveals direct anthropogenic impacts on migratory birds

Buchan, Claire, Franco, Aldina M. A. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6055-7378, Catry, Inês, Gamero, Anna, Klvaňová, Alena and Gilroy, James J. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7597-5780 (2022) Spatially explicit risk mapping reveals direct anthropogenic impacts on migratory birds. Global Ecology and Biogeography, 31 (9). pp. 1707-1725. ISSN 1466-822X

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Abstract

Aim: Migratory species rely on multiple ranges across the annual cycle, rendering them vulnerable to a wide range of spatially disparate anthropogenic threats. The spatial distribution of these threats will strongly influence the magnitude of their population-scale effects, but this has not been quantitatively assessed for most species. Location: Europe, Central Asia, Western Asia, Africa. Time period: Modern. Major taxa studied: Aves. Methods: We combined remote-sensed data and expert opinion to map 16 anthropogenic threats relevant to migratory birds across Europe, Africa and the Middle East – including the first spatially-explicit pan-continental assessment of relative hunting pressure. By combining the resulting composite threat maps with species range polygons and morpho-behavioural traits-based weightings (reflecting relative threat susceptibility), we created species-specific risk maps for 103 Afro-Palaearctic migratory birds breeding in Europe and evaluated how spatial threat vulnerability relates to long-term population trends. Results: We found that greater vulnerability to direct mortality threats (including hunting pressure, infrastructure and nocturnal lights), especially in the non-breeding season, is associated with declining bird population trends. Main conclusions: Our results emphasize the importance of spatially explicit approaches to quantifying anthropogenic drivers of population declines. Composite risk maps represent a valuable resource for spatial analyses of anthropogenic threats to migratory birds, allowing for targeted conservation actions.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Research Funding: European Commission. Grant Number: 07.0202/2019/821208/SER/ENV.D.2; Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia. Grant Number: DL57/2016/CP1440/CT0023; Natural Environment Research Council. Grant Number: NE/L002582/1 Data accessiblity: The relative hunting risk layers created in this manuscript are available as geotiffs from Figshare at https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.19745830 (Buchan et al. 2022a); all other layers are derived from publicly available sources listed in Table 1. The composite risk scores used in the analysis are available from Figshare at https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.19745983 (Buchan et al. 2022b).
Uncontrolled Keywords: afro-palaearctic,anthropogenic change,breeding,hunting,migratory birds,non-breeding,threat mapping,global and planetary change,ecology, evolution, behavior and systematics,ecology ,/dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/2300/2306
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Science > School of Biological Sciences
Faculty of Science > School of Environmental Sciences
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Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 26 May 2022 10:30
Last Modified: 27 Oct 2022 00:16
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/85178
DOI: 10.1111/geb.13551

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