Epizootics of Salmonella infection in poultry may be the result of modern selective breeding practices

Hunter, P.R. (1992) Epizootics of Salmonella infection in poultry may be the result of modern selective breeding practices. European Journal of Epidemiology, 8. pp. 851-855. ISSN 0393-2990

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Abstract

This paper discussess the hypothesis that a major factor in the epizootics of Salmonella infection in poultry is a declining host genetic diversity. A computer model is described which is based on models that have been previously used to investigate host-pathogen coevolution in cereal crops. It is shown that, as host genetic diversity declines, parasite diversity also declines to a lower equilibrium level. With a highly diverse host, parasite numbers decline to zero. With a homogeneous host population, after an initial decline, there is a rapid increase in parasite numbers, due to the selection of a particularly well adapted parasite strain. This simple computer simulation is used as the basis for a discussion of the literature supporting the suggestion that a major factor in the epizootic of Salmonella in poultry is related to the low genetic diversity of commercial poultry flocks.

Item Type: Article
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Related URLs:
Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 28 Feb 2022 11:30
Last Modified: 01 Mar 2022 01:09
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/83752
DOI: 10.1007/BF00145331

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