Improving well-being via well-being self-efficacy: a mixed methods multi-study of frontline care home staff

Vaughn, Oluwafunmilayo (2020) Improving well-being via well-being self-efficacy: a mixed methods multi-study of frontline care home staff. Doctoral thesis, University of East Anglia.

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Abstract

Frontline care home (FLCH) staff play a critical role in the effective running of care homes. Previous studies have reported high turnover rates and high stress levels amongst this staff group. Increasingly, the importance of well-being at work has been demonstrated in research. Some studies have also demonstrated an association between the quality of care and the well-being of staff in healthcare settings. Despite these insights, there has been little research to explore the well-being experience of FLCH staff. Much less research has investigated how they maintain their well-being and how they may be supported.

To address this, this thesis utilises the self-efficacy, and the stress, appraisal and coping theories (Bandura, 1997; Lazarus and Folkman, 1984) as frameworks to explore the well-being experience of FLCH staff. Guided by these theories, and applying mixed methods and a multi-study approach, this thesis explores the strategies which FLCH staff deploy to maintain their well-being, and the belief in their ability to deploy these strategies (well-being self-efficacy). It also explores the mechanisms by which this belief improves one’s well-being, and investigates a means by which this belief may be enhanced.

The overall findings show that when a difficult situation is encountered at work, shifting one’s focus, managing interpersonal conflict, and absorbing the impact of a stressor and restoring oneself, were the strategies consistently deployed. A new measure was also developed to assesses the belief in one’s ability to take action towards improve well-being at work (well-being self-efficacy). These findings contribute to knowledge of how FLCH staff improve their well-being, some processes via which self-efficacy influences well-being, and how FLCH staff may be supported. A three-tier system of support based on the findings of this research was developed. It provides a framework for instigating or guiding actions aimed at enhancing the well-being experience of FLCH staff in practice.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Social Sciences > Norwich Business School
Depositing User: Chris White
Date Deposited: 14 Dec 2021 10:38
Last Modified: 14 Dec 2021 10:38
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/82668
DOI:

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