Is there a lower visual field advantage for object affordances? A registered report

Warman, Annie, Clark, Allan ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2965-8941, Malcolm, George ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4892-5961, Havekost, Maximilian and Rossit, Stephanie ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6640-2289 (2024) Is there a lower visual field advantage for object affordances? A registered report. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. ISSN 1747-0218

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Abstract

It’s been repeatedly shown that pictures of graspable objects can facilitate visual processing, even in the absence of reach-to-grasp actions, an effect often attributed to the concept of affordances. A classic demonstration of this is the handle compatibility effect, characterised by faster reaction times when the orientation of a graspable object’s handle is compatible with the hand used to respond, even when the handle orientation is task-irrelevant. Nevertheless, it is debated whether the speeded reaction times are a result of affordances or spatial compatibility. First, we investigated whether we could replicate the handle compatibility effect while controlling for spatial compatibility. Participants (N = 68) responded with left or right-handed keypresses to whether the object was upright or inverted and, in separate blocks, whether the object was red or green. We failed to replicate the handle compatibility effect, with no significant difference between compatible and incompatible conditions, in both tasks. Second, we investigated whether there is a lower visual field (VF) advantage for the handle compatibility effect in line with what has been found for hand actions. A further 68 participants responded to object orientation presented either in the upper or lower VF. A significant handle compatibility effect was observed in the lower VF, but not the upper VF. This suggests that there is a lower VF advantage for affordances, possibly as the lower VF is where our actions most frequently occur. However, future studies should explore the impact of eye movements on the handle compatibility effect and tool affordances.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: perception,affordances,grasping,hand,reaction time,visual field,physiology,neuropsychology and physiological psychology,experimental and cognitive psychology,psychology(all),physiology (medical) ,/dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/1300/1314
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
UEA Research Groups: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Research Groups > Public Health and Health Services Research (former - to 2023)
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Research Groups > Norwich Clinical Trials Unit
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Research Groups > Health Services and Primary Care
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Research Groups > Epidemiology and Public Health
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Research Centres > Population Health
Faculty of Social Sciences > Research Groups > Cognition, Action and Perception
Faculty of Social Sciences > Research Groups > Developmental Science
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Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 24 Nov 2021 03:15
Last Modified: 14 Jul 2024 01:17
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/82300
DOI: 10.1177/17470218241230812

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