A systematic review of interventions to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviour following bariatric surgery

James, Jennifer D., Hardeman, Wendy ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6498-9407, Goodall, Mark, Eborall, Helen, Sprung, Victoria S., Bonnett, Laura J. and Wilding, John P. H. (2022) A systematic review of interventions to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviour following bariatric surgery. Physiotherapy, 115. pp. 1-17. ISSN 0031-9406

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Abstract

Background: Bariatric surgery promotes weight loss and improves co-morbid conditions, with patients who are more physically active having better outcomes. However, levels of physical activity and sedentary behaviour often remain unchanged following surgery. Objectives: To identify interventions and components thereof that are able to facilitate changes in physical activity and sedentary behaviour. Eligibility: Physical activity and/or sedentary behaviour must have been measured, pre and post intervention, in patients who have undergone bariatric surgery. Study appraisal and synthesis methods: Four databases were searched with key-words. Two researchers conducted paper screening, data extraction and risk-of-bias assessment. Results: Twelve studies were included; eleven were randomised. Two were delivered pre-surgery and ten post-surgery; five found positive effect. Moderate to vigorous physical activity increased in three studies, two of which also found a significant increase in step count. The fourth found a significant increase in strenuous activity and the fifth a significant increase in metabolic equivalent of task/day and reduced time spent watching television. Limitations: Meta-analysis could not be conducted due to heterogeneity of outcomes and the tools used. Conclusion and implications of key findings: This review has identified interventions and components thereof that were able to provoke positive effect. However, intervention and control conditions were not always well described particularly in terms of behaviour change techniques and the rationale for their use.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Funding Information: JW reports grants from National Institute for Health Research, during the conduct of the study; grants, personal fees and other from AstraZeneca, other from Astellas, personal fees and other from Boehringer Ingelheim, personal fees and other from Mundipharma, personal fees and other from Napp, grants, personal fees and other from Novo Nordisk, other from Lilly, other from Sanofi, grants, personal fees and other from Takeda, other from Wilmington Healthcare, other from Rhythm Pharmaceuticals, outside the submitted work. Jennifer James is funded by a National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) [ICA Clinical Doctoral Research Fellowship] for this research project. This publication presents independent research. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health and Social Care. Conflict of interest: JJ, WH, VSS, LJB, HE, MG have no declarations to declare.
Uncontrolled Keywords: bariatric surgery,physical activity,physiotherapy,sedentary behaviour,physical therapy, sports therapy and rehabilitation ,/dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/3600/3612
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Health Sciences
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Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 26 Oct 2021 00:41
Last Modified: 22 Oct 2022 15:30
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/81877
DOI: 10.1016/j.physio.2021.10.002

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