Effectiveness of offering tailored text message, self-help smoking cessation support to pregnant women who want information on stopping smoking: MiQuit3 randomised controlled trial (RCT) and meta‐analysis

Coleman, Tim, Clark, Miranda, Welch, Charlie, Whitemore, Rachel, Leonardi‐Bee, Jo, Cooper, Sue, Hewitt, Catherine, Jones, Matthew, Sutton, Stephen, Watson, Judith, Daykin, Karen, Ussher, Michael, Parrott, Steve and Naughton, Felix (2021) Effectiveness of offering tailored text message, self-help smoking cessation support to pregnant women who want information on stopping smoking: MiQuit3 randomised controlled trial (RCT) and meta‐analysis. Addiction. ISSN 0965-2140

[img]
Preview
PDF (Accepted_Manuscript) - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Aims: To test the efficacy of ‘MiQuit’, a tailored, self-help, text message stop smoking programme for pregnancy, as an adjunct to usual care (UC) for smoking cessation in pregnancy. Design: Multicentre, open, two-arm, parallel-group, superiority randomised controlled trial (RCT) and a trial sequential analysis (TSA) meta-analysis combining trial findings with two previous ones. Setting: Twenty-four English hospital antenatal clinics. Participants: A total of 1002 pregnant women who were ≥16 years old, were ≤25 weeks gestation and smoked ≥1 daily cigarette and accepted information on cessation with no requirement to set quit dates. Interventions: UC or UC plus ‘MiQuit’: 12 weeks of tailored, smoking cessation text messages focussed on inducing and aiding cessation. Measurements: Primary outcome: biochemically validated cessation between 4 weeks after randomisation and late pregnancy. Secondary outcomes: shorter and non-validated abstinence periods, pregnancy outcomes and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Findings: RCT: cessation was 5.19% (26/501) and 4.59% (23/501) in MiQuit and UC groups (adjusted odds ratio [adj OR] for quitting with MiQuit versus UC, 95% CI = 1.15 [0.65–2.04]); other abstinence findings were similar, with higher point estimates. Primary outcome ascertainment was 61.7% (309) and 67.3% (337) in MiQuit and UC groups with 71.1% (54/76) and 69.5% (41/59) abstinence validation rates, respectively. Pregnancy outcomes were similar and the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year was −£1118 (95% CI = −£4806–£1911). More MiQuit group women reported making at least one quit attempt (adj OR [95% CI]) for making an attempt, 1.50 (1.07–2.09). TSA meta-analysis: this found no significant difference in prolonged abstinence between MiQuit and UC (pooled OR = 1.49, adjusted 95% CI = 0.62–3.60). Conclusions: Irrespective of whether they want to try quitting, when offered a tailored, self-help, text message stop smoking programme for pregnancy (MiQuit) as an adjunct to usual care, pregnant women are not more likely to stop smoking until childbirth but they report more attempts at stopping smoking.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Funding Information: This project was co‐funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) under the Programme Grants for Applied Research programme (RP‐PG‐0109‐10 020) and Cancer Research UK (CRUK) (C11232/A23434). The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NIHR or the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC). T.C. is a National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Senior Investigator.
Uncontrolled Keywords: pregnancy,self-help,smoking cessation,text messaging,medicine (miscellaneous),psychiatry and mental health ,/dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/2700/2701
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Related URLs:
Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 15 Oct 2021 01:13
Last Modified: 17 Nov 2021 04:48
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/81722
DOI: 10.1111/add.15715

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item