Development of Photothermal FTIR Microspectroscopy as a Novel Means of Spatially Identifying Amorphous and Crystalline Salbutamol Sulfate on Composite Surfaces

Grisedale, Louise, Moffat, Jonathan, Jamieson, Matthew J., Belton, Peter, Barker, Susan A. and Craig, Duncan (2013) Development of Photothermal FTIR Microspectroscopy as a Novel Means of Spatially Identifying Amorphous and Crystalline Salbutamol Sulfate on Composite Surfaces. Molecular Pharmaceutics, 10 (5). 1815–1823. ISSN 1543-8384

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Abstract

Photothermal Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy (PTMS), involving the combination of FTIR spectroscopy with atomic force microscopy, has been used to examine compacts of amorphous and crystalline salbutamol sulfate in order to assess the ability of the technique to distinguish between different physical forms in a multicomponent material. Samples of amorphous and crystalline material were assessed using modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), atomic force microscopy, microthermal analysis, and conventional FTIR. Mixed compacts were then prepared such that verification of the location of the forms present was possible via topography and localized thermal analysis. PTMS studies were then performed on selected interrogation points, with spectra obtained which were largely intermediate between those corresponding to the two individual forms. Calculation of the thermal diffusivity indicated a resolution for the technique corresponding to a hemisphere of a major diameter in the region of 40 μm, which is large in relation to the particle sizes involved. However, distinction into amorphous, crystalline, and indeterminate categories was possible using chemometric analysis (hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis). Good agreement was found between the identification methods for the mixed systems. The study has therefore shown the potential, as well as identifying the limitations, of using PTMS as a means of spatially identifying components in complex materials.

Item Type: Article
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Science > School of Pharmacy
Faculty of Science > School of Chemistry
Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 12 Nov 2020 01:11
Last Modified: 30 Sep 2021 15:52
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/77660
DOI: 10.1021/mp300605s

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