Exploring the impact of direct and vicarious trauma on clinical staff working in high Intensity environments

Scott, Zoe (2020) Exploring the impact of direct and vicarious trauma on clinical staff working in high Intensity environments. Doctoral thesis, University of East Anglia.

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Abstract

Aims: This thesis portfolio aims to explore the impact of direct and vicarious trauma on clinical staff working in high intensity clinical environments.

Design: The thesis portfolio includes two main papers; a systematic review which reviews the use of psychological debriefing for clinical staff following direct and vicarious trauma in clinical settings, and an empirical paper exploring factors associated with secondary traumatic stress and burnout in neonatal intensive care staff. Three additional chapters providing supplementary information regarding methodology, additional results and an overall discussion and critical evaluation of the whole thesis portfolio is also included.

Results: The systematic review consists of 13 studies providing some evidence to suggest that psychological debriefing with clinical staff following exposure to direct and vicarious trauma in clinical settings can reduce distress symptomatology. Subjective evidence suggesting that clinical staff perceive psychological debriefing to be supportive and helpful was also found. The empirical paper revealed high levels of secondary traumatic stress and burnout amongst neonatal staff and indicated that levels of self-compassion and satisfaction with the working ward environment may influence prevalence and severity of secondary traumatic stress and burnout.

Conclusion: The thesis portfolio demonstrates that staff who are frequently exposed to direct and vicarious trauma within their working environment are at risk of emotional distress. To mitigate the impact of exposure to trauma, staff should be provided with appropriate support
such as psychological debriefing or interventions designed to nurture self-compassion, provide support and enhance personal stress management skills.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Depositing User: Chris White
Date Deposited: 11 Nov 2020 13:47
Last Modified: 11 Nov 2020 13:47
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/77642
DOI:

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