Exploring the psychology of wisdom and posttraumatic growth in older adults. A review of the literature and single case series trial for older adults experiencing depression.

Kadri, Adam (2020) Exploring the psychology of wisdom and posttraumatic growth in older adults. A review of the literature and single case series trial for older adults experiencing depression. Doctoral thesis, University of East Anglia.

[img]
Preview
PDF
Download (9MB) | Preview

Abstract

This research portfolio sought to explore the links between an emerging literature on the psychology of Wisdom, Posttraumatic Growth (PTG), and the mental health of older people. It was theorised that these concepts may have utility for enhancing the psychological wellbeing of older adults, consistent with theories of psychological development in later life. Two studies were conducted. First, a systematic review examining the evidence for PTG in older adults identified and reviewed 14 studies that explicitly examined PTG in older adult samples. It found evidence for PTG occurring in older adults, and highlighted that specific factors relating to older adults (e.g. trauma type, time since trauma and social processes of PTG) may need to be taken into consideration when understanding PTG in this population. Secondly, a clinical trial, utilising a multiple baseline single case experimental design with six participants, tested a Cognitive Behavioural Therapy wisdom enhancement timeline technique for depression in older adults. Four participants were deemed responders to the intervention, by demonstrating a significant reduction in depression scores that coincided with the onset of the intervention. Findings demonstrate promising utility for the technique, which utilises wisdom-based principles within a cognitive-behavioural framework for reducing depression symptoms. A process report on the technique is provided. Discussions on the potential benefits and challenges of applying wisdom-based principles to older adult Clinical Psychology are explored, and recommendations for further research on these topics are made.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Depositing User: Chris White
Date Deposited: 05 Nov 2020 09:25
Last Modified: 05 Nov 2020 09:25
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/77542
DOI:

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item