Smoking cessation and related factors in middle-aged and older Chinese adults: Evidence from a longitudinal study

Qiu, Dechao, Chen, Ting, Liu, Taiyi and Song, Fujian (2020) Smoking cessation and related factors in middle-aged and older Chinese adults: Evidence from a longitudinal study. PLoS One, 15 (10 October). ISSN 1932-6203

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Abstract

Objectives There are more than 300 million smokers in China. This study aimed to evaluate the rate of smoking cessation, smoking relapse and related factors in middle-aged and older smokers in China. Methods We performed a secondary analysis of data from China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) that recruited a nationally representative sample of adults aged 45 and older. Participants were 3708 smokers in 2011 who completed two waves of follow-up interviews in 2013 and 2015. Self-reported quit and relapse rates at follow-ups were estimated. Multiple logistic regressions were conducted to identify factors associated with smoking cessation and relapse. Results The overall quit rate was 8.5% (95% CI 7.7% - 9.5%) at the 2-year follow-up in 2013, and 16.6% (95% CI 15.5% - 17.9%) at the 4-year follow up. Smoking cessation in 2013 was associated with not living in the northeast region (p = 0.003), fewer cigarettes smoked daily (p <0.001), and longer time to the first cigarette in the morning (p<0.001). Smoking cessation in 2015 was associated with older age (p = 0.049), smoking initiation at age ≥20 years (p<0.001), longer time to the first cigarette in the morning (p<0.001), and self-perceived poor health (p<0.001). Of the 317 participants who stopped smoking in 2013, 13.3% (95% CI 9.9% - 17.5%) relapsed by 2015. Smoking relapse was associated with younger age (p = 0.025), shorter time to the first cigarette in the morning (p = 0.003), and self-perception of not poor health (p = 0.018). Conclusion The overall quit rate was 8.5% at the 2-year follow up, and 16.6% at the 4-year follow up in the middle-aged and older smokers, but 13% of quitters returned to smoking in two years. Successful smoking cessation was associated with older age, lower nicotine dependence, and self-perceived poor health.

Item Type: Article
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
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Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 31 Oct 2020 01:08
Last Modified: 13 May 2021 15:40
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/77486
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0240806

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