Enteral hydration in high‐flow therapy for infants with bronchiolitis: Secondary analysis of a randomised trial

Babl, Franz E., Franklin, Donna, Schlapbach, Luregn J., Oakley, Ed, Dalziel, Stuart, Whitty, Jennifer ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5886-1933, Neutze, Jocelyn, Furyk, Jeremy S., Craig, Simon, Fraser, John, Jones, Mark and Schibler, Andreas (2020) Enteral hydration in high‐flow therapy for infants with bronchiolitis: Secondary analysis of a randomised trial. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 56 (6). pp. 950-955. ISSN 1440-1754

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Abstract

Aim: Nasal high-flow oxygen therapy is increasingly used in infants for supportive respiratory therapy in bronchiolitis. It is unclear whether enteral hydration is safe in children receiving high-flow. Methods: We performed a planned secondary analysis of a multi-centre, randomised controlled trial of infants aged <12 months with bronchiolitis and an oxygen requirement. Children were assigned to treatment with either high-flow or standard-oxygen therapy with optional rescue high-flow. We assessed adverse events based on how children on high-flow were hydrated: intravenously (IV), via bolus or continuous nasogastric tube (NGT) or orally. Results: A total of 505 patients on high-flow via primary study assignment (n = 408), primary treatment (n = 10) or as rescue therapy (n = 87) were assessed. While on high flow, 15 of 505 (3.0%) received only IV fluids, 360 (71.3%) received only enteral fluids and 93 (18.4%) received both IV and enteral fluids. The route was unknown in 37 (7.3%). Of the 453 high-flow infants hydrated enterally patients could receive one or more methods of hydration; 80 (15.8%) received NGT bolus, 217 (43.0%) NGT continuous, 118 (23.4%) both bolus and continuous, 32 (6.3%) received only oral hydration and 171 (33.9%) a mix of NGT and oral hydration. None of the patients receiving oral or NGT hydration on high-flow sustained pulmonary aspiration (0%; 95% confidence interval N/A); one patient had a pneumothorax (0.2%; 95% confidence interval 0.0–0.7%). Conclusions: The vast majority of children with hypoxic respiratory failure in bronchiolitis can be safely hydrated enterally during the period when they receive high-flow.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: bronchiolitis,enteral hydration,high-flow,nasogastric tube insertion,lidocaine,double-blind,nasal cannula oxygen,children,pediatrics, perinatology, and child health ,/dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/2700/2735
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
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Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 03 Apr 2020 00:45
Last Modified: 22 Oct 2022 05:50
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/74696
DOI: 10.1111/jpc.14799

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