First line oxygen therapy with high-flow in bronchiolitis is not cost saving for the health service

Gc, Vijay S. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0365-2605, Franklin, Donna, Whitty, Jennifer A. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5886-1933, Dalziel, Stuart R., Babl, Franz E., Schlapbach, Luregn J., Fraser, John F., Craig, Simon, Neutze, Jocelyn, Oakley, Ed and Schibler, Andreas (2020) First line oxygen therapy with high-flow in bronchiolitis is not cost saving for the health service. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 105 (10). pp. 975-980. ISSN 0003-9888

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Abstract

Background Bronchiolitis is the most common reason for hospital admission in infants. High-flow oxygen therapy has emerged as a new treatment; however, the cost-effectiveness of using it as first-line therapy is unknown. Objective To compare the cost of providing high-flow therapy as a first-line therapy compared with rescue therapy after failure of standard oxygen in the management of bronchiolitis. Methods A within-trial economic evaluation from the health service perspective using data from a multicentre randomised controlled trial for hypoxic infants (≤12 months) admitted to hospital with bronchiolitis in Australia and New Zealand. Intervention costs, length of hospital and intensive care stay and associated costs were compared for infants who received first-line treatment with high-flow therapy (early high-flow, n=739) or for infants who received standard oxygen and optional rescue high-flow (rescue high-flow, n=733). Costs were applied using Australian costing sources and are reported in 2016–2017 AU$. Results The incremental cost to avoid one treatment failure was AU$1778 (95% credible interval (CrI) 207 to 7096). Mean cost of bronchiolitis treatment including intervention costs and costs associated with length of stay was AU$420 (95% CrI −176 to 1002) higher per infant in the early high-flow group compared with the rescue high-flow group. There was an 8% (95% CrI 7.5 to 8.6) likelihood of the early high-flow oxygen therapy being cost saving. Conclusions The use of high-flow oxygen as initial therapy for respiratory failure in infants with bronchiolitis is unlikely to be cost saving to the health system, compared with standard oxygen therapy with rescue high-flow.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: costing,health economics,intensive care,respiratory,pediatrics, perinatology, and child health ,/dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/2700/2735
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
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Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 03 Apr 2020 00:45
Last Modified: 22 Oct 2022 05:50
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/74695
DOI: 10.1136/archdischild-2019-318427

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