Increasing prevalence of a fluoroquinolone resistance mutation amongst Campylobacter jejuni isolates from four human infectious intestinal disease studies in the United Kingdom

Haldenby, Sam, Bronowski, Christina, Nelson, Charlotte, Kenny, John, Martinez-Rodriguez, Carmen, Chaudhuri, Roy, Williams, Nicola J, Forbes, Ken, Strachan, Norval J, Pulman, Jane, Winstanley, Ian N, Corless, Caroline E, Humphrey, Tom J, Bolton, Frederick J, O'Brien, Sarah J, Hall, Neil, Hertz-Fowler, Christiane and Winstanley, Craig (2020) Increasing prevalence of a fluoroquinolone resistance mutation amongst Campylobacter jejuni isolates from four human infectious intestinal disease studies in the United Kingdom. PLoS One, 15 (1). ISSN 1932-6203

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Campylobacter jejuni is the most common bacterial cause of human infectious intestinal disease. METHODS: We genome sequenced 601 human C. jejuni isolates, obtained from two large prospective studies of infectious intestinal disease (IID1 [isolates from 1993-1996; n = 293] and IID2 [isolates from 2008-2009; n = 93]), the INTEGRATE project [isolates from 2016-2017; n = 52] and the ENIGMA project [isolates from 2017; n = 163]. RESULTS: There was a significant increase in the prevalence of the T86I mutation conferring resistance to fluoroquinolone between each of the three later studies (IID2, INTEGRATE and ENIGMA) and IID1. Although the distribution of major multilocus sequence types (STs) was similar between the studies, there were changes in both the abundance of minority STs associated with the T86I mutation, and the abundance of clones within single STs associated with the T86I mutation. DISCUSSION: Four population-based studies of community diarrhoea over a 25 year period revealed an increase over time in the prevalence of the T86I amongst isolates of C. jejuni associated with human gastrointestinal disease in the UK. Although associated with many STs, much of the increase is due to the expansion of clones associated with the resistance mutation.

Item Type: Article
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Science > School of Biological Sciences
Related URLs:
Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 01 Feb 2020 04:25
Last Modified: 31 Mar 2020 00:42
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/73939
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0227535

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