The cost-effectiveness of physical activity interventions in adolescents: model development and illustration using two exemplar interventions

Gc, Vijay S., Suhrcke, Marc, Atkin, Andrew J., van Sluijs, Esther M. F. and Turner, David (2019) The cost-effectiveness of physical activity interventions in adolescents: model development and illustration using two exemplar interventions. BMJ Open, 9 (8). ISSN 2044-6055

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Abstract

Objective : To develop a model to assess the long-term costs and health outcomes of physical activity interventions targeting adolescents. Design : A Markov cohort simulation model was constructed with the intention of being capable of estimating long-term costs and health impacts of changes in activity levels during adolescence. The model parameters were informed by published literature and the analysis took a National Health Service perspective over a lifetime horizon. Univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were undertaken. Setting : School and community Participants : A hypothetical cohort of adolescents aged 16 years at baseline. Interventions : Two exemplar school-based: a comparatively simple, after-school intervention and a more complex multi-component intervention compared to usual care. Primary and secondary outcome measures: Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio as measured by cost per quality-adjusted life year gained. Results : The model gave plausible estimates of the long-term effect of changes in physical activity. The use of two exemplar interventions suggests that the model could potentially be used to evaluate a number of different physical activity interventions in adolescents. The key model driver was the degree to which intervention effects were maintained over time. Conclusions : The model developed here has the potential to assess long-term value for money of physical activity interventions in adolescents. The two applications of the model indicate that complex interventions may not necessarily be the ones considered the most cost-effective when longer-term costs and consequences are taken into account.

Item Type: Article
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 02 Jul 2019 08:30
Last Modified: 22 Apr 2020 07:59
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/71600
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-027566

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