A meta-analysis of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy efficacy for depression between working age adults and older people.

Werson, Alessa (2019) A meta-analysis of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy efficacy for depression between working age adults and older people. Masters thesis, University of East Anglia.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Repository staff only until 28 May 2021.

Download (2MB) | Request a copy

Abstract

This meta-analysis investigated CBT efficacy in depression and compared treatment outcomes between working age adults and older people. The aim was to compare outcomes of CBT for depression between working age adults with older people as definite as can be achieved at this stage. This examination is of particular importance due to the aging population, high prevalence levels of depression, increasing demand on IAPT services and stigma attached with older in psychological treatment.

The analysis examined CBT pre-post treatment outcomes, as well as comparing post treatment outcomes between CBT treatment and alternative psychological treatments. Literature searches completed in both age groups applied the inclusion criteria, which resulted to include 19 articles for the working age adults and 12 articles for older people. Data analysis found an overall significant effect for CBT treatment (including both age groups) between pre and post intervention (g= 1.43, 95% CI =1.19 to 1.66, Z= 11.67, p<.000), with no difference between the two age groups. Comparing CBT treatment with other treatments (including both age groups) found a significant result in favour of CBT (g= -0.36, 95% CI= -0.49 to -0.22, Z= -5.216, p<0.000), and no difference was found in this result between working age adults and older people. CBT was for both age groups significantly more efficacious compared to active psychological treatments (g= -0.16, 95% CI= -0.29 to -0.03, Z= -2.35, p<0.02), and significantly more beneficial compared to non-active treatment (g= -0.59, 95% CI= -0.82 to -0.36, Z= -5.02, p<.001). Subgroup analyses on CBT pre and post intervention effect revealed neither intervention format or intervention length influences effect size findings. Quality analyses into the articles included in the meta-analysis showed findings were robust and support the notion of CBT being equally efficacious for depression treatment in older people as in working age adults.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Depositing User: Gillian Aldus
Date Deposited: 07 Jun 2019 12:34
Last Modified: 07 Jun 2019 12:34
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/71269
DOI:

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item