Exposure to intergroup conspiracy theories promotes prejudice which spreads across groups

Jolley, Daniel, Meleady, Rose and Douglas, Karen (2020) Exposure to intergroup conspiracy theories promotes prejudice which spreads across groups. British Journal of Psychology, 111 (1). pp. 17-35. ISSN 0007-1269

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Abstract

This research experimentally examined the effects of exposure to intergroup conspiracy theories on prejudice and discrimination. Study 1 (N = 166) demonstrated that exposure to conspiracy theories concerning immigrants to Britain from the European Union (vs. anti-conspiracy material or a control) exacerbated prejudice towards this group. Study 2 (N = 173) found the same effect in a different intergroup context—exposure to conspiracy theories about Jewish people (vs. anti-conspiracy material or a control) increased prejudice towards this group and reduced participants’ willingness to vote for a Jewish political candidate. Finally, Study 3 (N = 114) demonstrated that exposure to conspiracy theories about Jewish people not only increased prejudice towards this group but was indirectly associated with increased prejudice towards a number of secondary outgroups (e.g., Asians, Arabs, Americans, Irish, Australians). The current research suggests that conspiracy theories may have potentially damaging and widespread consequences for intergroup relations.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2019 The Authors. British Journal of Psychology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Psychological Society.
Uncontrolled Keywords: conspiracy theories,prejudice,discrimination,intergroup relations,aids,anti-semitism,contact,conspiracy theories,attitudes,belief,threat,intentions,predictors,consequences,association
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Related URLs:
Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 14 Feb 2019 10:30
Last Modified: 23 Nov 2020 00:45
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/69927
DOI: 10.1111/bjop.12385

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