Men’s Refashioning of Masculine Identities in Uganda and Their Self-Management of HIV Treatment

Russell, Steven (2019) Men’s Refashioning of Masculine Identities in Uganda and Their Self-Management of HIV Treatment. Qualitative Health Research, 29 (8). pp. 1199-1212. ISSN 1049-7323

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Abstract

Studies in sub-Saharan Africa show that masculine identities contribute to men’s relatively lower uptake of HIV services. Although useful, these studies pay less attention to men’s agency to negotiate and refashion masculine identities which better suit their lives as men living with HIV. In this article, I analyze the refashioning of masculine identities among men living with HIV in Uganda, adjustment processes which helped their self-management, and adherence to treatment. In-depth interviews with 18 men are thematically analyzed. Physical recovery was the embodiment of recovered masculinity and underpinned the men’s ability to refashion alternative, hybrid masculinities. Men negotiated and refashioned two forms of dominant masculinity already identified in this context, respectability and reputation, notably being a responsible father again and supporting other men with HIV, and being strong, resilient and an HIV survivor. Understanding men’s refashioning of masculinities can inform service providers’ approaches to reach more men with HIV treatment.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: aids,gender,masculinity,illness and disease,experiences,coping and adaptation,self-care,adherence,african continental ancestry group,qualitative,africa,uganda,public health, environmental and occupational health ,/dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/2700/2739
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Social Sciences > School of International Development
Related URLs:
Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 21 Dec 2018 12:30
Last Modified: 25 Jun 2020 00:29
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/69424
DOI: 10.1177/1049732318823717

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