Exploring clinical psychologists’ understandings and experiences of how they use reflective practice in their clinical work: an interpretative phenomenological analysis.

Carmichael, Kirsty (2018) Exploring clinical psychologists’ understandings and experiences of how they use reflective practice in their clinical work: an interpretative phenomenological analysis. Doctoral thesis, University of East Anglia.

[img]
Preview
PDF
Download (5MB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Reflective practice is regarded as a key competency in managing the complexity and uniqueness of clinical work (Schön, 1983). However, the dearth of research combined with the methodological limitations of how this concept has been explored has limited our understanding of how reflective practice is being used in clinical practice, particularly outside of a training context.

Design: This project is presented as a thesis portfolio, which includes a systematic review of qualitative literature on the uses of reflective practice among qualified therapists’, an empirical study exploring clinical psychologists’ experiences of how they use reflective practice in their clinical work, an extended methodology chapter, and a discussion and critical evaluation chapter.

Results: The systematic review produced eight studies, and within these seven interrelated themes emerged, which were encapsulated by two overarching themes: the value of reflective practice and conceptualising reflective practice. Despite difficulties with understanding and integrating reflective practice, therapists reported many benefits to reflection including: increasing self-awareness, enhancing connection with clients, enhancing clinical practice and facilitating self-care. The empirical study used an interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA), which produced three superordinate themes to capture participants’ experiences of reflective practice: 1) discovery through exploratory questioning, 2) containment in practice through making sense of their thoughts and feelings and 3) human survival.

Conclusion: The findings from the systematic review suggest the criticisms of the literature have yet to be addressed, with the majority of studies reporting therapists’ retrospective opinions of reflective practice. The findings from the empirical study suggest reflective practice may enhance perspective-taking abilities, interpersonal skills, and personal resilience. The study has begun to address criticisms of the literature by combining reflective diaries and interviews to capture lived experience, therefore linking the benefits of reflective practice to real world examples.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Depositing User: Gillian Aldus
Date Deposited: 26 Nov 2018 15:38
Last Modified: 26 Nov 2018 15:38
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/69042
DOI:

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item