Sleep duration and psychotic experiences in patients at risk of psychosis: A secondary analysis of the EDIE-2 trial

Reeve, S., Nickless, A., Sheaves, B., Hodgekins, J., Stewart, S.L.K., Gumley, A., Fowler, D., Morrison, A. and Freeman, D. (2019) Sleep duration and psychotic experiences in patients at risk of psychosis: A secondary analysis of the EDIE-2 trial. Schizophrenia Research, 204. pp. 326-333. ISSN 0920-9964

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Abstract

Sleep disturbance is common among individuals at risk of psychosis, yet few studies have investigated the relationship between sleep disturbance and clinical trajectory. The Early Detection and Intervention Evaluation (EDIE-2) trial provides longitudinal data on sleep duration and individual psychotic experiences from a cohort of individuals at risk of psychosis, which this study utilises in an opportunistic secondary analysis. Shorter and more variable sleep was hypothesised to be associated with more severe psychotic experiences and lower psychological wellbeing. Mixed effect models were used to test sleep duration and range as predictors of individual psychotic experiences and psychological wellbeing over the 12–24 months (with assessments every 3 months) in 160 participants. Shorter sleep duration was associated with more severe delusional ideas and hallucinations cross-sectionally and longitudinally. The longitudinal relationships did not remain significant after conservative controls were added for the previous severity of psychotic experiences. No significant relationships were found between the sleep variables and other psychotic experiences (e.g. cognitive disorganisation), or psychological wellbeing. The results support a relationship between shorter sleep duration and delusional ideas and hallucinations. Future studies should focus on improving sleep disturbance measurement, and test whether treating sleep improves clinical trajectory in the at-risk group.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: at risk,sleep,psychosis,longitudinal
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Related URLs:
Depositing User: LivePure Connector
Date Deposited: 03 Sep 2018 15:31
Last Modified: 27 Aug 2020 23:54
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/68185
DOI: 10.1016/j.schres.2018.08.006

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