Persecutory delusions: Effects of cognitive bias modification for interpretation and the Maudsley Review Training Programme on social anxiety, jumping to conclusions, belief inflexibility and paranoia

Hurley, James, Hodgekins, Jo, Coker, Sian and Fowler, David (2018) Persecutory delusions: Effects of cognitive bias modification for interpretation and the Maudsley Review Training Programme on social anxiety, jumping to conclusions, belief inflexibility and paranoia. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 61. pp. 14-23. ISSN 0005-7916

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Abstract

Background and objectives: The Threat Anticipation Model (Freeman, 2007) implicates social anxiety, jumping to conclusions (JTC) and belief inflexibility in persecutory delusions. We investigated whether Cognitive Bias Modification for Interpretation (CBM-I; Turner et al., 2011) improves social anxiety by targeting negative interpretation bias of ambiguous social information. We determined whether the Maudsley Review Training Programme (MRTP; Waller et al., 2011) improves JTC, belief inflexibility and paranoia. We also explored effects of CBM-I on JTC/belief inflexibility and paranoia, as well as the MRTP on social anxiety. Methods: Twelve participants from Early Intervention and Recovery Services in East Anglia completed measures of social anxiety, paranoia, JTC and belief inflexibility. A concurrent multiple baseline case series design was used. Results: Three of twelve participants improved in social anxiety following CBM-I, paranoia improved in 6/12 cases. CBM-I had no effect on JTC/belief inflexibility. The MRTP improved JTC and/or belief inflexibility in 9/12 cases, while improving paranoia for 6/12 individuals. The MRTP improved social anxiety in one case. Limitations: The small sample size and large effects necessary for single case series designs limit the generality of findings. These are discussed in more detail. Conclusions: This study suggests that whilst both CBM-I and the MRTP may have a positive impact on paranoia and social anxiety, the effects on JTC/belief inflexibility are largely specific to the MRTP. Relationships between social anxiety, JTC, belief inflexibility and paranoia existed in 10/12 individuals, supporting the Threat Anticipation Model.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: persecutory delusions,psychosis,cognitive bias modification for interpretation,the maudsley review training program,jumping to conclusions,social anxiety
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
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Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 11 May 2018 10:30
Last Modified: 10 May 2020 23:52
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/67031
DOI: 10.1016/j.jbtep.2018.05.003

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