How Distinctive Is Philosophers’ Intuition Talk?

Andow, James (2015) How Distinctive Is Philosophers’ Intuition Talk? Metaphilosophy, 46 (4-5). pp. 515-538. ISSN 0026-1068

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Abstract

The word “intuition” is one frequently used in philosophy. It is often assumed that the way in which philosophers use the word, and others like it, is very distinctive. This claim has been subjected to little empirical scrutiny, however. This article presents the first steps in a qualitative analysis of the use of intuition talk in the academy. It presents the findings of two preliminary empirical studies. The first study examines the use of intuition talk in spoken academic English. The second examines the use of intuition talk in written academic English. It considers what these studies tell us about the distinctiveness of philosophical language and methods and considers some implications for evaluative and ameliorative methodology.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: metaphilosophy,sociology of philosophy,intuitions,philosophical methods,english for academic purposes,descriptive methodology
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Arts and Humanities > School of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication Studies
University of East Anglia > Faculty of Arts and Humanities > Research Groups > Philosophy
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Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 18 Jan 2018 12:30
Last Modified: 22 Apr 2020 06:07
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/66001
DOI: 10.1111/meta.2015.46.issue-4-5

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