Day-and-night hybrid closed-loop insulin delivery in adolescents with type 1 diabetes:A free-living, randomized clinical trial

Tauschmann, Martin, Allen, Janet M, Wilinska, Malgorzata E, Thabit, Hood, Stewart, Zoë, Cheng, Peiyao, Kollman, Craig, Acerini, Carlo L, Dunger, David B, Hovorka, Roman and Murphy, Helen (2016) Day-and-night hybrid closed-loop insulin delivery in adolescents with type 1 diabetes:A free-living, randomized clinical trial. Diabetes Care, 39 (7). pp. 1168-1174. ISSN 0149-5992

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate feasibility, safety, and efficacy of day-and-night hybrid closed-loop insulin delivery in adolescents with type 1 diabetes under free-living conditions without remote monitoring or supervision.  RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In an open-label, randomized, free-living, crossover study design, 12 adolescents receiving insulin pump therapy (mean [±SD] age 15.4 ± 2.6 years; HbA1c 8.3 ± 0.9%; duration of diabetes 8.2 ± 3.4 years) underwent two 7-day periods of sensor-augmented insulin pump therapy or hybrid closed-loop insulin delivery without supervision or remote monitoring. During the closed-loop insulin delivery, a model predictive algorithm automatically directed insulin delivery between meals and overnight; prandial boluses were administered by participants using a bolus calculator.  RESULTS: The proportion of time when the sensor glucose level was in the target range (3.9-10 mmol/L) was increased during closed-loop insulin delivery compared with sensor-augmented pump therapy (72% vs. 53%, P < 0.001; primary end point), the mean glucose concentration was lowered (8.7 vs. 10.1 mmol/L, P = 0.028), and the time spent above the target level was reduced (P = 0.005) without changing the total daily insulin amount (P = 0.55). The time spent in the hypoglycemic range was low and comparable between interventions.  CONCLUSIONS: Unsupervised day-and-night hybrid closed-loop insulin delivery at home is feasible and safe in young people with type 1 diabetes. Compared with sensor-augmented insulin pump therapy, closed-loop insulin delivery may improve glucose control without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia in adolescents with suboptimally controlled type 1 diabetes.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 05 Jan 2018 16:27
Last Modified: 22 Apr 2020 01:26
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/65872
DOI: 10.2337/dc15-2078

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