Systematic review and meta-analysis of the reliability and discriminative validity of cartilage compositional MRI in knee osteoarthritis

Mackay, James, Low, Samantha B L, Smith, Toby, Toms, Andoni, McCaskie, Andrew and Gilbert, Fiona (2018) Systematic review and meta-analysis of the reliability and discriminative validity of cartilage compositional MRI in knee osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, 26 (9). pp. 1140-1152. ISSN 1063-4584

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Abstract

Objective: To assess reliability and discriminative validity of cartilage compositional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in knee osteoarthritis (OA).  Design: The study was carried out per PRISMA recommendations. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE (1974 - present) for eligible studies. We performed qualitative synthesis of reliability data. Where data from at least 2 discrimination studies were available, we estimated pooled standardized mean difference (SMD) between subjects with and without OA. Discrimination analyses compared controls and subjects with mild OA (Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade 1-2), severe OA (KL grade 3-4) and OA not otherwise specified (NOS) where not possible to stratify. We assessed quality of the evidence using QAREL and QUADAS-2 tools.  Results: Fifty-eight studies were included in the reliability analysis and 25 studies were included in the discrimination analysis, with data from a total of 1,989 knees. Intra-observer, inter-observer and test-retest reliability of compositional techniques were excellent with most intraclass correlation coefficients > 0.8 and coefficients of variation < 10%. T1rho and T2 relaxometry were significant discriminators between subjects with mild OA and controls, and between subjects with OA (NOS) and controls (p < 0.001). T1rho showed best discrimination for mild OA (SMD [95% CI] = 0.73 [0.40 to 1.06], p < 0.001) and OA (NOS) (0.60 [0.41 to 0.80], p < 0.001). Quality of evidence was moderate for both parts of the review.  Conclusions: Cartilage compositional MRI techniques are reliable and, in the case of T1rho and T2 relaxometry, can discriminate between subjects with OA and controls.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: knee osteoarthritis,magnetic reasonance imaging,cartilage composition,quantitative cartilage imaging,cartilage mapping
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 21 Nov 2017 06:05
Last Modified: 11 Jun 2020 00:39
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/65507
DOI: 10.1016/j.joca.2017.11.018

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