SalmoNet, an integrated network of ten Salmonella enterica strains reveals common and distinct pathways to host adaptation

Métris, Aline, Sudhakar, Padhmanand, Fazekas, David, Demeter, Amanda, Ari, Eszter, Olbei, Marton, Branchu, Priscilla, Kingsley, Rob A., Baranyi, Jozsef and Korcsmáros, Tamas (2017) SalmoNet, an integrated network of ten Salmonella enterica strains reveals common and distinct pathways to host adaptation. npj Systems Biology and Applications, 3. ISSN 2056-7189

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Abstract

Salmonella enterica is a prominent bacterial pathogen with implications on human and animal health. Salmonella serovars could be classified as gastro-intestinal or extra-intestinal. Genome-wide comparisons revealed that extra-intestinal strains are closer relatives of gastro-intestinal strains than to each other indicating a parallel evolution of this trait. Given the complexity of the differences, a systems-level comparison could reveal key mechanisms enabling extra-intestinal serovars to cause systemic infections. Accordingly, in this work, we introduce a unique resource, SalmoNet, which combines manual curation, high-throughput data and computational predictions to provide an integrated network for Salmonella at the metabolic, transcriptional regulatory and protein-protein interaction levels. SalmoNet provides the networks separately for five gastro-intestinal and five extra-intestinal strains. As a multi-layered, multi-strain database containing experimental data, SalmoNet is the first dedicated network resource for Salmonella. It comprehensively contains interactions between proteins encoded in Salmonella pathogenicity islands, as well as regulatory mechanisms of metabolic processes with the option to zoom-in and analyze the interactions at specific loci in more detail. Application of SalmoNet is not limited to strain comparisons as it also provides a Salmonella resource for biochemical network modeling, host-pathogen interaction studies, drug discovery, experimental validation of novel interactions, uncovering new pathological mechanisms from emergent properties and epidemiological studies. SalmoNet is available at http://salmonet.org.

Item Type: Article
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Science > School of Biological Sciences
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 26 Oct 2017 05:05
Last Modified: 22 Apr 2020 05:49
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/65268
DOI: 10.1038/s41540-017-0034-z

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