Cost-effectiveness of a preferred intensity exercise programme for young people with depression compared with treatment as usual: an economic evaluation alongside a clinical trial in the UK

Turner, David, Carter, Tim, Sach, Tracey, Guo, Boliang and Callaghan, Patrick (2017) Cost-effectiveness of a preferred intensity exercise programme for young people with depression compared with treatment as usual: an economic evaluation alongside a clinical trial in the UK. BMJ Open, 7. ISSN 2044-6055

[img] PDF (Accepted manuscript) - Submitted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 31 December 2099.

Download (615kB) | Request a copy
[img]
Preview
PDF (Published manuscript) - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (484kB) | Preview

Abstract

Objectives: To assess the cost-effectiveness of preferred intensity exercise programme for young people with depression compared with a treatment as usual control group. Design: A ‘within trial’ cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis conducted alongside a randomised controlled trial. The perspective of the analysis was the UK National Health Service and social services. Setting: The intervention was provided in a community leisure centre setting. Participants: 86 young people aged 14–17 years attending Tier 2 and Tier 3 CAMHS (Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services) outpatient services presenting with depression. Interventions: The intervention comprised 12 separate sessions of circuit training over a 6-week period. Sessions were supervised by a qualified exercise therapist. Participants also received treatment as usual. The comparator group received treatment as usual. Results: We found improvements in the Children’s Depression Inventory-2 (CDI-2) and estimated cost-effectiveness at £61 per point improvement in CDI-2 for the exercise group compared with control. We found no evidence that the exercise intervention led to differences in quality-adjusted life years (QALY). QALYs were estimated using the EQ-5D-5L (5-level version of EuroQol-5 dimension). Conclusions: There is evidence that exercise can be an effective intervention for adolescents with depression and the current study shows that preferred intensity exercise could also represent a cost-effective intervention in terms of the CDI-2.

Item Type: Article
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 17 Oct 2017 05:05
Last Modified: 11 Jun 2020 00:37
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/65147
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016211

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item