A socialised conceptualisation of individual privacy: a theoretical and empirical study of the notion of the ‘public’ in UK MoPI cases

Mead, David (2017) A socialised conceptualisation of individual privacy: a theoretical and empirical study of the notion of the ‘public’ in UK MoPI cases. Journal of Media Law, 9 (1). pp. 100-131. ISSN 1757-7632

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Abstract

This article conceptualises a more public, more socialised notion of privacy in contrast to the archetype: that my privacy is of interest and value only to me. Doing so has historically left claims to privacy exposed against claims to free speech, with its long pedigree and generally acknowledged wider instrumental role. This article provides a corrective. The first part offers a typology of rationales at one of two meta-levels: privacy as a means to effect assurance or as a means to protect someone's activities. The second discusses the results of some small-scale empirical doctrinal research: a sample analysis of 27 UK privacy cases looking to identify the judicial ascription of the value of privacy, specifically whether any judges conceptualise privacy as having a more social, or public, value or utility. The results are perhaps not unexpected. Almost exclusively, judges frame their rationales for protecting privacy in purely individualised terms.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: privacy,freedom of expression,public interest,mopi,misuse of private information,ultimate balancing test,socialised conceptualisation of privacy
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Social Sciences > School of Law
Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 22 Apr 2017 05:09
Last Modified: 22 Jul 2020 01:30
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/63283
DOI: 10.1080/17577632.2017.1321227

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