The built environment and cognitive disorders: Results from the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study II

Wu, Yu-Tzu, Prina, A. Matthew, Jones, Andy, Matthews, Fiona E. and Brayne, Carol (2017) The built environment and cognitive disorders: Results from the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study II. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 53 (1). 25–32. ISSN 0749-3797

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Abstract

Introduction: Features of built environment have been related to behavior modification and might stimulate cognitive activity with a potential impact on cognitive health in later life. The aim of this study is to investigate cross-sectional associations between features of land use, cognitive impairment and dementia and also explore urban and rural differences in these associations. Methods: Postcodes of the 7505 community-based participants (age 65+) in the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study II (collected in 2008–2011) were linked to environmental data from government statistics. A multilevel logistic regression was used to investigate associations between cognitive impairment (defined as MMSE≤25), dementia (GMS-AGECAT organicity level≥3) and land use features, including natural environment availability and land use mix, fitting interaction terms with three rural/urban categories. Data were analyzed in 2015. Results: Associations between features of land use and cognitive impairment were not linear. After adjusting for individual-level factors and area deprivation, living in areas with high land use mix was associated with a nearly 30% decreased odds of cognitive impairment (OR: 0.72; 95%CI: 0.58, 0.89). This was similar, yet non-significant, for dementia (OR: 0.70; 95%CI: 0.46, 1.06). In urban conurbations, living in areas with high natural environment availability was associated with 30% reduced odds of cognitive impairment (OR: 0.70; 95%CI: 0.50, 0.97). Conclusions: Non-linear associations between features of land use and cognitive impairment were confirmed in this new cohort of older people in England. Both a lack and overload of environmental stimulation may be detrimental to cognition in later life.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
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Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 08 Nov 2016 16:00
Last Modified: 22 Apr 2020 01:54
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/61267
DOI: 10.1016/j.amepre.2016.11.020

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