Vitamin D expenditure is not altered in pregnancy and lactation despite changes in vitamin D metabolite concentrations

Jones, Kerry S, Assar, Shima, Prentice, Ann and Schoenmakers, Inez (2016) Vitamin D expenditure is not altered in pregnancy and lactation despite changes in vitamin D metabolite concentrations. Scientific Reports, 6. ISSN 2045-2322

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Abstract

Pregnancy and lactation are associated with changes in vitamin D and calcium metabolism but the impact of these changes on vitamin D expenditure is unknown. We measured plasma 25(OH)D3 half-life with a stable-isotope tracer and investigated relationships with vitamin D metabolites in pregnant, lactating and 'non-pregnant, non-lactating' (NPNL) women. Vitamin D metabolites, vitamin D binding protein (DBP), PTH and 25(OH)D3 half-life were measured in third-trimester pregnant women (n22) and repeated during lactation 12 weeks post-partum (n14) and twice in NPNL women (n23 and n10, respectively) in rural Gambia where calcium intakes are low with little seasonality in UVB-exposure. 25(OH)D3 half-life was not significantly different between groups (mean(SD): 20.6(6.8), 22.6(7.7), 18.0(4.7) and 17.7(9.5) days in pregnant, lactating and NPNL women, respectively). Plasma 25(OH)D3, 1,25(OH)2D, and DBP were higher in pregnancy, and calculated free-25(OH)D3 and PTH were lower (P < 0.05). In lactation, 25(OH)D3 and 24,25(OH)2D3 were lower compared to pregnant (P < 0.001, P = 0.02) and NPNL women (P = 0.04, P = 0.07). Significant associations were observed between half-life and 25(OH)D3 (+ve) in pregnancy, and in all groups between 25(OH)D3 and free-25(OH)D3 (+ve) and PTH and 25(OH)D3 (-ve) (P < 0.0001). These data suggest that adaptive changes in pregnancy and lactation occur that prevent pronounced changes in vitamin D expenditure.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 24 Sep 2016 00:49
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2019 00:08
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/60232
DOI: 10.1038/srep26795

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