Predicting bee community responses to land-use changes: Effects of geographic and taxonomic biases

De Palma, Adriana, Abrahamczyk, Stefan, Aizen, Marcelo A., Albrecht, Matthias, Basset, Yves, Bates, Adam, Blake, Robin J., Boutin, Céline, Bugter, Rob, Connop, Stuart, Cruz-López, Leopoldo, Cunningham, Saul A., Darvill, Ben, Diekötter, Tim, Dorn, Silvia, Downing, Nicola, Entling, Martin H., Farwig, Nina, Felicioli, Antonio, Fonte, Steven J., Fowler, Robert, Franzén, Markus, Goulson, Dave, Grass, Ingo, Hanley, Mick E., Hendrix, Stephen D., Herrmann, Farina, Herzog, Felix, Holzschuh, Andrea, Jauker, Birgit, Kessler, Michael, Knight, M. E., Kruess, Andreas, Lavelle, Patrick, Le Féon, Violette, Lentini, Pia, Malone, Louise A., Marshall, Jon, Pachón, Eliana Martínez, McFrederick, Quinn S., Morales, Carolina L., Mudri-Stojnic, Sonja, Nates-Parra, Guiomar, Nilsson, Sven G., Öckinger, Erik, Osgathorpe, Lynne, Parra-H, Alejandro, Peres, Carlos A., Persson, Anna S., Petanidou, Theodora, Poveda, Katja, Power, Eileen F., Quaranta, Marino, Quintero, Carolina, Rader, Romina, Richards, Miriam H., Roulston, T’ai, Rousseau, Laurent, Sadler, Jonathan P., Samnegård, Ulrika, Schellhorn, Nancy A., Schüepp, Christof, Schweiger, Oliver, Smith-Pardo, Allan H., Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf, Stout, Jane C., Tonietto, Rebecca K., Tscharntke, Teja, Tylianakis, Jason M., Verboven, Hans A. F., Vergara, Carlos H., Verhulst, Jort, Westphal, Catrin, Yoon, Hyung Joo and Purvis, Andy (2016) Predicting bee community responses to land-use changes: Effects of geographic and taxonomic biases. Scientific Reports, 6. ISSN 2045-2322

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Abstract

Land-use change and intensification threaten bee populations worldwide, imperilling pollination services. Global models are needed to better characterise, project, and mitigate bees' responses to these human impacts. The available data are, however, geographically and taxonomically unrepresentative; most data are from North America and Western Europe, overrepresenting bumblebees and raising concerns that model results may not be generalizable to other regions and taxa. To assess whether the geographic and taxonomic biases of data could undermine effectiveness of models for conservation policy, we have collated from the published literature a global dataset of bee diversity at sites facing land-use change and intensification, and assess whether bee responses to these pressures vary across 11 regions (Western, Northern, Eastern and Southern Europe; North, Central and South America; Australia and New Zealand; South East Asia; Middle and Southern Africa) and between bumblebees and other bees. Our analyses highlight strong regionally-based responses of total abundance, species richness and Simpson's diversity to land use, caused by variation in the sensitivity of species and potentially in the nature of threats. These results suggest that global extrapolation of models based on geographically and taxonomically restricted data may underestimate the true uncertainty, increasing the risk of ecological surprises.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Science > School of Environmental Sciences
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Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 24 Sep 2016 00:33
Last Modified: 22 Jul 2020 01:02
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/60091
DOI: 10.1038/srep31153

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