Exposure to ambient air pollution and the risk of inflammatory bowel disease: a European nested case-control study

Opstelten, Jorrit L., Beelen, Rob M. J., Leenders, Max, Hoek, Gerard, Brunekreef, Bert, van Schaik, Fiona D. M., Siersema, Peter D., Eriksen, Kirsten T., Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole, Tjønneland, Anne, Overvad, Kim, Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine, Carbonnel, Franck, de Hoogh, Kees, Key, Timothy J., Luben, Robert, Chan, Simon S. M., Hart, Andrew R., Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas and Oldenburg, Bas (2016) Exposure to ambient air pollution and the risk of inflammatory bowel disease: a European nested case-control study. Digestive Diseases and Sciences, 61 (10). 2963–2971. ISSN 0163-2116

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Abstract

Background: Industrialization has been linked to the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Aim: We investigated the association between air pollution exposure and IBD. Methods: The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort was used to identify cases with Crohn’s disease (CD) (n = 38) and ulcerative colitis (UC) (n = 104) and controls (n = 568) from Denmark, France, the Netherlands, and the UK, matched for center, gender, age, and date of recruitment. Air pollution data were obtained from the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects. Residential exposure was assessed with land-use regression models for particulate matter with diameters of <10 μm (PM10), <2.5 μm (PM2.5), and between 2.5 and 10 μm (PMcoarse), soot (PM2.5 absorbance), nitrogen oxides, and two traffic indicators. Conditional logistic regression analyses were performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Although air pollution was not significantly associated with CD or UC separately, the associations were mostly similar. Individuals with IBD were less likely to have higher exposure levels of PM2.5 and PM10, with ORs of 0.24 (95 % CI 0.07–0.81) per 5 μg/m3 and 0.25 (95 % CI 0.08–0.78) per 10 μg/m3, respectively. There was an inverse but nonsignificant association for PMcoarse. A higher nearby traffic load was positively associated with IBD [OR 1.60 (95 % CI 1.04–2.46) per 4,000,000 motor vehicles × m per day]. Other air pollutants were positively but not significantly associated with IBD. Conclusion: Exposure to air pollution was not found to be consistently associated with IBD.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Uncontrolled Keywords: air pollution,particulate matter,inflammatory bowel disease,crohn’s disease,ulcerative colitis
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 24 Sep 2016 00:08
Last Modified: 22 Jul 2020 00:58
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/59846
DOI: 10.1007/s10620-016-4249-4

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