The role of terpenes as protectors of the potato crop

Holden, Alexandra (2015) The role of terpenes as protectors of the potato crop. Masters thesis, University of East Anglia.

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Abstract

Potato is the world’s fourth largest food crop, however farmers lose a significant part of this crop due to factors such as disease and inefficient storage. Potato growers in North Norfolk, who grow specifically for the crisping industry, are under pressure to minimise losses.
Potato Cyst Nematode is a pathogen of the potato crop, affecting 80% of UK potato fields. The potato initiates infection by signalling its presence to nematodes. A heptacyclic triterpenoid, Solanoeclepin A, is released by potato roots into the soil. Nematodes sense this compound and infect the host. Possible solutions to mediate the problem require an understanding of the biosynthesis of Solanoeclepin A. Candidate oxidosqualene cyclase genes have been identified in potato and have been expressed in N. benthamiana to determine their function and possible involvement in Solanoeclepin A biosynthesis.
Major potato crop losses are also caused by the onset of sprouting during storage. Potatoes are harvested in September, but must be stored for up to ten months of the year. Chlorpropham (CIPC) is used widely in the industry as a sprouting inhibitor, however, EU legislation changes have reduced its usage. Monoterpenes may provide an alternative natural solution to sprouting inhibition. S-Carvone has been shown to suppress sprouting in potato varieties, and importantly, has no effect on processing quality of potatoes. Cyclodextrins have been studied as a possible mechanism for improving application efficiency of sprouting inhibitors. This work should be useful in providing alternative sprouting inhibitors for the potato industry.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Science > School of Biological Sciences
Depositing User: Jackie Webb
Date Deposited: 04 May 2016 08:42
Last Modified: 31 Aug 2016 00:38
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/58550
DOI:

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