Radial artery blood gas sampling: A randomised controlled trial of lidocaine local anaesthesia

Wade, Ryckie G., Crawfurd, Jim, Wade, Donna and Holland, Richard (2015) Radial artery blood gas sampling: A randomised controlled trial of lidocaine local anaesthesia. Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine, 8 (4). pp. 185-191. ISSN 1756-5391

[img] Microsoft Word (Arterial Blood Gas Sampling - A RCT of Lidocaine Local Anaesthesia (2014)) - Submitted Version
Download (141kB)
[img]
Preview
Image (TIFF) (Figure 1 - Wade et al) - Draft Version
Download (14kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Image (TIFF) (Figure 3 - Wade et al) - Draft Version
Download (22kB) | Preview
[img] Other (Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine - Decision on Manuscript ID JEBM-2014-07-034 email ref DL-SW-5-a) - Draft Version
Download (36kB)
[img]
Preview
Image (TIFF) (Figure 4 - Wade et al) - Draft Version
Download (24kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Image (TIFF) (Figure 2 - Wade et al) - Draft Version
Download (22kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Image (TIFF) (Figure 5 - Wade et al) - Draft Version
Download (32kB) | Preview

Abstract

Introduction: Radial artery puncture is a common procedure and yet the role of local anaesthesia for reducing the pain of this procedure continues to be debated. Clinical practice is variable and there is potential for substantial financial savings. This is the first randomised trial to investigate the effectiveness of subcutaneously injected lidocaine anaesthesia on the perceived pain of radial artery puncture and the financial impact. Methods: Between December 2012 and April 2013, 43 patients in the Emergency Department were randomised into the intervention group to receive lidocaine 1% 1ml subcutaneously or the control group (to receive no local anaesthesia) prior to radial artery puncture for blood gas sampling. Pain was rated on a 10cm visual analogue scale (VAS) and procedural variables collected for between group analyses. Results: Overall, 41 participants were included. Subcutaneously injected lidocaine anaesthesia did not reduce the median pain of radial artery puncture (control 1.8 vs. intervention 1.6 cm, p=0.938). Those patients who had other systemically acting analgesia appeared to report reduced pain for radial artery puncture (0.60 vs. 2.30 cm, p=0.105) as did those where a smaller 25-gauge needle was used compared to the standard 22-gauge reported (1.40 vs. 4.35 cm, p=0.150), although these were not statistically significant. Anxious patients and those requesting local anaesthesia experienced relatively higher levels of pain. Conclusion: Local anaesthesia did not reduce the perceived pain of radial artery puncture.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: pain,success,outcome,local,injected,subcutaneous,anaesthesia,anaesthetic,lidocaine,radial,artery,arterial,blood,gas,randomised,clinical,controlled,control,trial,needle
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 08 Apr 2016 16:02
Last Modified: 17 Mar 2020 21:45
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/58178
DOI: 10.1111/jebm.12177

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item