The cost effectiveness of maintenance schedules following pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial

Burns, Darren, Wilson, Edward, Browne, Paula, Olive, Sandra, Clark, Allan, Galey, Penny, Dix, Emma, Woodhouse, Helene, Robinson, Sue and Wilson, Andrew (2016) The cost effectiveness of maintenance schedules following pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial. Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, 14 (1). pp. 105-115. ISSN 1175-5652

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Abstract

Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affects approximately 3 million people in the UK. An 8-week pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) course is recommended under current guidelines. However, studies show that initial benefits diminish over time. Objective: We present here an economic evaluation conducted alongside a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a low-intensity maintenance programme over a time horizon of 1 year delivered in UK primary and secondary care settings. Methods: Patients with COPD who completed at least 60 % of a standard 8-week PR programme were randomised to a 2-h maintenance session at 3, 6 and 9 months (n = 73) or treatment as usual (n = 75). Outcomes were change in Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire (CRQ) score, EQ-5D-based QALYs, cost (price year 2014) to the UK NHS and social services over the 12 months following initial PR, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). Results: At 12 months, incremental cost to the NHS and social services was −£204.04 (95 % CI −£1522 to £1114). Incremental CRQ and QALY gains were −0.007 (−0.461 to 0.447) and +0.015 (−0.050 to 0.079), respectively. Based on point estimates, PR maintenance therefore dominates treatment as usual from the perspective of the NHS and social services in terms of cost per QALY gained. Whether it is cost effective in terms of CRQ depends on whether the £204 per patient could be reinvested elsewhere to a CRQ gain of greater than 0.007. However, there is much decision uncertainty: 95 % CIs around increments did not exclude zero, and there is a 72.9 % (72.5 %) probability that the ICER is below £20,000 (£30,000) per QALY. Conclusion: Future research should explore whether more intensive maintenance regimens offer benefit to patients at reasonable cost.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease,economic evaluation
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 09 Feb 2016 09:28
Last Modified: 28 Oct 2019 15:12
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/57001
DOI: 10.1007/s40258-015-0199-9

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